Peer Review #2 of "No conclusive evidence that difficult general knowledge questions cause a "Google Stroop effect". A replication study (v0.2)" [peer_review]

2020 unpublished
Access to the digital "all-knowing cloud" has become an integral part of our daily lives. It has been suggested that the increasing offloading of information and information processing services to the cloud will alter human cognition and metacognition in the short and long term. A much-cited study published in Science in 2011 provided first behavioral evidence for such changes in human cognition. Participants had to answer difficult trivia questions, and subsequently showed longer response
more » ... in a variant of the Stroop task with internet-related words ("Google Stroop effect"). The authors of this study concluded that the concept of the Internet is automatically activated in situations where information is missing (e.g., because we might feel the urge to "google" the information). However, the "Google Stroop effect" could not be replicated in two recent replication attempts as part of a large replicability project. After the failed replication was published in 2018, the first author of the original study pointed out some problems with the design of the failed replication. In our study, we therefore aimed to replicate the "Google Stroop effect" with a research design closer to the original experiment. Our results revealed no conclusive evidence in favor of the notion that the concept of the Internet or internet access (via computers or smartphones) is automatically activated when participants are faced with hard trivia questions. We provide recommendations for follow-up research PeerJ reviewing PDF | Manuscript to be reviewed 1 No conclusive evidence that difficult general 2 knowledge questions cause a "Google Stroop effect". 3 A replication study 4 5 Manuscript to be reviewed 15 Abstract 16 Access to the digital "all-knowing cloud" has become an integral part of our daily lives. It has been 17 suggested that the increasing offloading of information and information processing services to the 18 cloud will alter human cognition and metacognition in the short and long term. A much-cited study 19 published in Science in 2011 provided first behavioral evidence for such changes in human 20 cognition. Participants had to answer difficult trivia questions, and subsequently showed longer 21 response times in a variant of the Stroop task with internet-related words ("Google Stroop effect"). 22 The authors of this study concluded that the concept of the Internet is automatically activated in 23 situations where information is missing (e.g., because we might feel the urge to "google" the 24 information). However, the "Google Stroop effect" could not be replicated in two recent replication 25 attempts as part of a large replicability project. After the failed replication was published in 2018, 26 the first author of the original study pointed out some problems with the design of the failed 27 replication. In our study, we therefore aimed to replicate the "Google Stroop effect" with a research 28 design closer to the original experiment. Our results revealed no conclusive evidence in favor of 29 the notion that the concept of the Internet or internet access (via computers or smartphones) is 30 automatically activated when participants are faced with hard trivia questions. We provide 31 recommendations for follow-up research.
doi:10.7287/peerj.10325v0.2/reviews/2 fatcat:r5cmchzxpzhmnjap5x7z44iudm