Attributable risk, population attributable risk, and population attributable fraction of death associated with hypertension in a biracial population

D C Deubner, H A Tyroler, J C Cassel, C G Hames, C Becker
1975 Circulation  
In 1961, blood pressure was measured in the 40-69-year-old segment of the population of Evans County, Georgia. Mortality was monitored for up to ten years. The relationship found between hypertension and mortality is characterized in this report by four parameters: attributable risk, prevalence, population attributable risk, and population attributable fraction. Attributable risk of death, a measure of the over-all impact of hypertension on those in each race-sex group with hypertension, is
more » ... ypertension, is high in white males, black males, and black females, and is lowest in white females. Population attributable risk, a measure of the impact of hypertension on each entire race-sex group, is highest in black males and females due to the high prevalence of hypertension in blacks. It is somewhat lower in white males and lowest in white females. The fraction of all deaths attributable to hypertension (population attributable fraction) is highest in black females and lower in the other three groups. The population attributable fraction (ranging from 0.26 to 0.54 for systolic hypertension) is of such magnitude that if the 50% reduction in mortality achieved in the Veteran Administration Cooperative Study could be repeated in the general population, life expectancy after 40 years of age could be substantially increased. to the attributable risk (AR) times the prevalence (P) death associated with hypertension in a biracial population. Attributable risk, population attributable risk, and population attributable fraction of
doi:10.1161/01.cir.52.5.901 pmid:1175273 fatcat:mm4vl4wd75hvvcgmrvifrfl33a