Associations of diarised sleep onset time, period and duration with total and central adiposity in a biethnic sample of young children: the Born in Bradford study [article]

Paul J Collings, Jane E Blackwell, Elizabeth Pal, Helen Ball, John Wright
2020 medRxiv   pre-print
Objectives: To investigate associations of sleep timing, period and duration with total and abdominal adiposity in a biethnic sample of children aged 18 and 36 months (m) Design: Cross-sectional observational study Setting: The Born in Bradford 1000 study, UK Participants: Children aged approximately 18m (n=209; 40.2% South Asian; 59.8% White) and 36m (n=162; 40.7% South Asian; 59.3% White) Primary and secondary outcome measures: Parents completed a 3-day sleep diary from which children's
more » ... ch children's average daily sleep onset time, period and duration were calculated. Weekday to weekend differences in sleep parameters were also derived. As outcomes, indices of total (BMI z-score and sum of 2-skinfolds) and abdominal adiposity (waist circumference) were measured. Adjusted regression was used to quantify associations of sleep parameters with adiposity by age group and ethnicity. Results: The average daily sleep onset time was markedly later in South Asian (9:26pm ± 68 mins) than White children (7:41pm ± 48 mins). Later sleep onset was associated with lower BMI z-score and sum of 2-skinfolds in White children aged 18m. In contrast, later sleep onset was associated with higher BMI z-score in South Asian children aged 36m. For weekday to weekend differences, longer sleep duration and later sleep onset on weekends than weekdays were both associated with higher total and abdominal adiposity in South Asian children aged 18m. On the contrary, compared to consistent sleep onset times, going to sleep ≥20 minutes later on weekends than weekdays was associated with lower waist circumference in White children aged 18m. Conclusions: Sleep timing is associated with total and central adiposity in young children but associations differ by age group and ethnicity. Sleep onset times and regular sleep schedules may be important for obesity prevention.
doi:10.1101/2020.09.30.20193888 fatcat:ntn3nwzlgzeidbi23xdnkrgdhu