Race/Ethnicity, Social Class, and Leisure-Time Physical Inactivity

SIMON J. MARSHALL, DEBORAH A. JONES, BARBARA E. AINSWORTH, JARED P. REIS, SUSAN S. LEVY, CAROLINE A. MACERA
2007 Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise  
Purpose: The aims of this study were to determine 1) prevalence of leisure-time physical inactivity in a nationally representative sample of non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic men and women; 2) prevalence of leisure-time inactivity by racial/ethnic group across social class indicators; and 3) the relationship between leisure-time inactivity and occupational physical activity, independent of other social class indicators. Methods: The National Physical Activity and Weight Loss
more » ... urvey was a telephone survey of noninstitutionalized U.S. adults (4695 men, 6516 women) conducted by random digit dialing between September and December 2002. Self-reported physical activity was assessed using questions from the 2001 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Respondents who reported no moderate-or vigorous-intensity physical activity during leisure time in a usual week were classified as inactive. Indicators of social class were education, family income, employment status, and marital status. Results: Age-adjusted prevalence of leisure-time inactivity was 9.9% T 0.6 SE (standard error) and 12.0 T 0.6 for white men and women, respectively; 19.0 T 2.5 and 25.2 T 2.1 for non-Hispanic black men and women, and 20.9 T 2.1 and 27.3 T 2.5 for Hispanic men and women. Within each racial/ethnic group, prevalence of leisure-time inactivity was highest among participants of lower social class. Differences in inactivity by racial/ethnic group were less evident after adjustment for social class. Odds of inactivity were similar across quartiles of occupational physical activity after adjustment for age, sex, and social class. Conclusions: Non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics were more inactive during their leisure time than were non-Hispanic whites. Social class but not occupational physical activity seems to moderate the relationship between race/ethnicity and leisure-time physical inactivity.
doi:10.1249/01.mss.0000239401.16381.37 pmid:17218883 fatcat:2uja5evtnzd7hj2h7pqifprfem