Clinical Observations FURNISHED BY A CASE IN WHICH THE RIGHT CAROTID ARTERY WAS RECENTLY LIGATURED AT ST. GEORGE'S HOSPITAL

JohnW. Ogle
1869 The Lancet  
PHYSICIAN TO THE HOSPITAL. Contraction of the pup;;l, probably the result of injury of the so-called cervical sympathetic nerve; modifications of the temperature of the head; peculiar unilateral sweating, *c. THE case alluded to was the one operated upon by my colleague, Mr. Henry Lee, and shortly noticed in THE LANCET for Jan. 16th last (see p. 94). With the surgical aspect of the case I have nothing to do (though I shall give some account of the surgical progress, derived from the notes kept
more » ... rom the notes kept by Mr. Bowles, clinical clerk to Mr. Lee); but I have to thank Mr. Lee for the opportunity of watching the case and noticing several phenomena of great interest which it presented, and which I now place on record. The patient, as stated in THE LANCET, was aged forty, and had been a soldier for nineteen years and a half. It appears that he had generally enjoyed very good health until about five years ago, when he was shot by a bullet, which passed through the outer third of the right clavicle, making its exit about an inch behind the bone. Between seven and eight weeks afterwards the wound quite healed, and he rejoined his regiment in the field, where he thinks he took cold, and an abscess formed about the cicatrix of the old wound. One abscess after another formed, until the greater
doi:10.1016/s0140-6736(02)65521-7 fatcat:yvdmzv6p2jhwjex7cxgc3wpr7a