THE SYMPTOM-COMPLEX OF THE ACUTE POSTERIOR POLIOMYELITIS OF THE GENICULATE, AUDITORY, GLOSSOPHARYNGEAL AND PNEUMOGASTRIC GANGLIA

J. RAMSAY HUNT
1910 Archives of Internal Medicine  
In previous communications1 I have already elaborated in some detail the symptomatology and complications of the posterior poliomyelitis of the geniculate ganglion of the facial nerve; a syndrome which is characterized by herpes zoster oticus, facial palsy and auditory symptoms. When the ganglion alone is involved, herpes oticus results, the eruption being distributed in the central portions of the external ear. If the inflammation extends from the ganglion to the nerve-trunk, facial palsy
more » ... , facial palsy follows; and when deafness and symptoms of M\l=e'\ni\l=e'\re'sdisease occur they are produced either by an extension of the inflammatory process to the adjacent auditory nerve or by simultaneous involvement of the peripheral auditory ganglia (Fig. 1) . I shall now consider the localization of the same process in the peripheral root ganglia of the glossopharyngeal, vagus, and auditory nerves, their respective neural complications and the various clinical combinations which may occur.2 I shall also endeavor to differentiate the zoster zones of the geniculate, glossopharyngeal, and vagal ganglia on the external ear, and within the buccal cavity. It may be said in general that all of these clinical types are related, and together form a definite group of cases, which is characterized by herpes zoster of the cephalic extremity, with facial palsy, auditory, and pneumogastric symptoms in various combinations. This group forms an interesting chapter of herpes zoster, an affection which is distinguished by an eruption of herpetic vesicles, usually uni¬ lateral, and strictly limited to a definite area of the skin or mucous mem¬ brane (the zoster zone). The underlying lesion is an inflammation in 1. Hunt, J. Ramsay: Herpetic
doi:10.1001/archinte.1910.00050280097006 fatcat:7mi7u7q5lfbjhi2udpu2ldby7e