California's hardwood resource: managing for wildlife, water, pleasing scenery, and wood products [report]

Philip M. McDonald, Dean W. Huber
1995 unpublished
McDonald, Philip M.; Huber, Dean W. 1995. California's hardwood resource: managing for wildlife, water, pleasing scenery, and wood products. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-154. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 23 p. A new management perspective that emphasizes a variety of amenities and commodities is needed for California's forest-zone hardwoods. For the near future and perhaps more on public than on private land, these "yields" are
more » ... "yields" are wildlife, water, esthetics, and wood products. Each is presented first as an individual yield and then as part of a combined yield. As an individual yield, water, for example, might have great utility for a power and light company desirous of filling its reservoirs; as a combined yield, the worth of water for wildlife, tree growth, and esthetics also is high. Managing the hardwood forest for these yields requires some special considerations. Foremost is to consider all of the yields in an ecosystem setting with special regard to managing larger areas for longer timeframes. Within this setting are several factors central to a new perspective for managing hardwoods. These include the need for a well developed hardwood processing industry and the expanded role of silviculture. Teamwork, scheduling, social considerations, and total yield also are included and then incorporated into the special management situations of agroforestry and the urban interface. Some guidelines and recommendations are then presented to further management of forest-zone hardwoods in California in the 21st century.
doi:10.2737/psw-gtr-154 fatcat:ljgmymz4qzgajk4cbllif3lnle