Peer Review #1 of "Capacity for heat absorption by the wings of the butterfly Tirumala limniace (Cramer) (v0.3)" [peer_review]

2019 unpublished
Butterflies can directly absorb heat from the sun via their wings to facilitate autonomous flight. However, how is the heat absorbed by the butterfly from sunlight stored and transmitted in the wing? The answer to this scientific question remains unclear. The butterfly Tirumala limniace (Cramer) is a typical heat absorption insect, and its wing surface color is only composed of light and dark color. Thus, in this study, we measured a number of wing traits relevant for heat absorption including
more » ... sorption including the thoracic temperature at different light intensities and wing opening angles, the thoracic temperature of butterflies with only one right fore wing or one right hind wing; In addition, the spectral reflectance of the wing surfaces, the thoracic temperature of butterflies with the scales removed or present in light or dark areas, and the real-time changes in heat absorption by the wing surfaces with temperature were also measured. We found that high intensity light (600-60000 lx) allowed the butterflies to absorb more heat and 60−90° was the optimal angle for heat absorption. The heat absorption capacity was stronger in the fore wings than the hind wings. Dark areas on the wing surfaces were heat absorption areas. The dark areas in the lower region of the fore wing surface and the inside region of the hind wing surface were heat storage areas. Heat was transferred from the heat storage areas to the wing base through the veins near the heat storage areas of the fore and hind wings. PeerJ reviewing PDF | ABSTRACT 12 Butterflies can directly absorb heat from the sun via their wings to facilitate autonomous flight. 13 However, how is the heat absorbed by the butterfly from sunlight stored and transmitted in the 14 wing? The answer to this scientific question remains unclear. The butterfly Tirumala limniace 15 (Cramer) is a typical heat absorption insect, and its wing surface color is only composed of light 16 and dark color. Thus, in this study, we measured a number of wing traits relevant for heat 17 absorption including the thoracic temperature at different light intensities and wing opening angles, 18 the thoracic temperature of butterflies with only one right fore wing or one right hind wing; In 19 addition, the spectral reflectance of the wing surfaces, the thoracic temperature of butterflies with 20 the scales removed or present in light or dark areas, and the real-time changes in heat absorption 21 by the wing surfaces with temperature were also measured. We found that high intensity light 22 (600-60000 lx) allowed the butterflies to absorb more heat and 60−90° was the optimal angle for 23 heat absorption. The heat absorption capacity was stronger in the fore wings than the hind wings. 24 Dark areas on the wing surfaces were heat absorption areas. The dark areas in the lower region of 25 the fore wing surface and the inside region of the hind wing surface were heat storage areas. Heat 26 was transferred from the heat storage areas to the wing base through the veins near the heat storage 27 areas of the fore and hind wings. 28
doi:10.7287/peerj.6648v0.3/reviews/1 fatcat:zjvp3cvew5gthcxz6p6nfkkcq4