GUMP

Robert N. Lass, Joe Macker, David Millar, Ian J. Taylor
2010 Proceeding of the 2nd workshop on Bio-inspired algorithms for distributed systems - BADS '10  
In this paper we present a generic environment for creating message-oriented server-side proxies to support adaptation from TCP transport-oriented client-server sessions to manyto-many peer-to-peer networking environments more suitable for deployment in dynamic wireless networks, capable of multicast forwarding. At its input, GUMP provides an interface for exposing network server implementations in order to allow existing GUI applications to connect to GUMP. At the back-end, GUMP's generic
more » ... ce discovery and multicast interfaces allow access to multiple implementations, enabling the discovery of necessary services on the network, maintenance of the network state, and transport of messages amongst peers, for tuning to a specific network environment. At the heart of GUMP, there is a mechanism for selecting a server-side proxy implementation for a given messaging protocol, allowing multiple proxies to co-exist and run time adaption of the system. As a primary example and use case, we show how GUMP has been used to implement an XMPP proxy allowing existing off-the-shelf XMPP client software to dynamically create and operate multi-user chat sessions in a serverless network environment. This resulting proxy integration demonstrates the power of GUMP in its ability to adapt between different methods of input using either HTTP or TCP oriented server systems, the use of its different discovery subsystem bindings (SLPv2 and JmDNS), and its support for multicast architectures. GUMP therefore allows a single messaging protocol server-side implementation to be dynamically adapted to suit a particular distributed wireless deployment environment at run time. Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports, 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. In this paper we present a generic environment for creating message-oriented server-side proxies to support adaptation from TCP transport-oriented client-server sessions to many-to-many peer-to-peer networking environments more suit-able for deployment in dynamic wireless networks, capable of multicast forwarding. At its input, GUMP provides an in-terface for exposing network server implementations in order to allow existing GUI applications to connect to GUMP. At the back-end, GUMP's generic service discovery and mul-ticast interfaces allow access to multiple implementations enabling the discovery of necessary services on the network maintenance of the network state, and transport of messages amongst peers, for tuning to a speci c network environment. At the heart of GUMP, there is a mechanism for selecting a server-side proxy implementation for a given messaging protocol, allowing multiple proxies to co-exist and run time adaption of the system. As a primary example and use case we show how GUMP has been used to implement an XMPP proxy allowing existing o -the-shelf XMPP client software to dynamically create and operate multi-user chat sessions in a serverless network environment. This resulting proxy integration demonstrates the power of GUMP in its abil-ity to adapt between di erent methods of input using either HTTP or TCP oriented server systems, the use of its di erent discovery subsystem bindings (SLPv2 and JmDNS), and its support for multicast architectures. GUMP therefore al-lows a single messaging protocol server-side implementation to be dynamically adapted to suit a particular distributed wireless deployment environment at run time. 15 . SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report (SAR) 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 8 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18
doi:10.1145/1809018.1809026 fatcat:rtaedaf3zbhxvns7omdbz2xob4