Relation between choice-induced preference change and depression

Madoka Miyagi, Makoto Miyatani, Takashi Nakao, Thomas Boraud
2017 PLoS ONE  
Most experimental studies of depressive symptom effects on decision-making have examined situations in which a single correct answer exists based on external circumstances (externally guided decision-making, e.g., gambling task). In addition to such decisionmaking, for decision-making of other types, no correct answer exists based on external circumstances (internally guided decision-making, e.g., preference judgment). For internally guided decision-making, a phenomenon is known by which
more » ... nce for the chosen item increases and preference for the rejected item is decreased after choosing between two equally preferred items which is designated as choice-induced preference change. Recent reports suggest that this phenomenon is explainable by reinforcement learning theory just as it is with externally guided decision-making. Although many earlier studies have revealed the effects of depression in externally guided decision-making, the relation between depressive symptoms and choice-induced preference change remains unclear. This study investigated the relation between depressive symptoms and choice-induced preference change using the blind choice paradigm. Results show that depressive symptoms are correlated with change in preference of rejected items (Spearman's r = .28, p = .04): depressed individuals tend to show less decreased preference of rejected items. These results indicate that individual differences of depressive symptoms affect choice-induced preference change. We discuss the mechanisms underlying the relation between depression and choiceinduced preference change. Measures Self-reported depressive symptom level. Each participant's tendency to depression was assessed using the Japanese version of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale Relation between choice-induced preference change and depression PLOS ONE | https://doi. Fig 2. Experimental tasks. Experimental tasks constructed in three sessions: Pre-choice rating task, Blind choice task, and Post-choice rating task. In the Pre-choice rating task, participants were presented items for 3 s. They rated their preference for it on an eight-point scale. In the blind choice task, participants were instructed that two images that were rated in the pre-choice rating task were presented subliminally. Of the two images, they were asked to choose the one which they preferred. In fact, however, two identical dummy images were presented for 7 ms. After the choices were made, the two images were presented. The red rectangle denotes that it was chosen blindly. In the post-choice rating task, participants were presented the same image stimuli as those of the pre-choice rating task. Their preference was rated again. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0180041.g002 Relation between choice-induced preference change and depression PLOS ONE | https://doi.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0180041 pmid:28662126 pmcid:PMC5491117 fatcat:xrn4gnpvlncovdjzzyslmcleoy