Directional preferences of the Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus scirpaceus) and the Sedge Warbler (A. schoenobaenus) on autumn migration at Lake Drużno (N Poland)

Magdalena Formella, Przemysław Busse
2002 Ring  
Formella M., Busse P. 2002. Directional preferences of the Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus scirpaceus) and the Sedge Warbler (A. schoenobaenus) on autumn migration at Lake Dru¿no (N Poland). Ring 24, 2: 15-29. In 2000, during the whole autumn migration period, Reed Warblers (212 indiv.) and Sedge Warblers (205 indiv.) were tested with Busses method (Busse 1995) for directional behaviour at Lake Dru¿no ringing site. Distributions of scratches, reflecting cage activity of an individual, were tested
more » ... uniformity and more than 97% showed directional behaviour of tested birds. The data were elaborated using non-standard method for evaluation of circular data proposed by Busse and Trociñska (1999) that allows to show multi-modal distributions. Results show that as much as around 55% of obtained headings point at directions reversed in relation to the normal direction of autumn migration. They suggest that pronounced number of individuals show axial behaviour in the cage. Causes of this phenomenon are still vague and it was decided that directional behaviour will be discussed after reversing northward headings by the doubling the angle method (adding 180°). Then main directions of headings were set as WSW, SSW and SE. They were confronted with available ringing recovery data and quite high (10-12°difference) or even very high (WSW beam of migration of Reed Warblers 5°difference) accordance was found. Using, for the comparison, the same method to the Lesser Whitethroat (Sylvia curruca) data published elsewhere, an excellent agreement between cage data and ringing recoveries at the level 2°only was found. This can be treated as a check of the field and evaluation methods used for basic data presented in the paper. The heading pattern changed in the course of autumn migration and in subsequent periods different headings dominated. The most clear it was for the Reed Warbler data. However, this problem still needs further analyses.
doi:10.2478/v10050-008-0076-0 fatcat:s7wy26ljdbfrdfotfsbqgzilya