Some Indiana Glaciology [editorial]

John M. Coulter
1884 Science  
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more » ... ntent at http://about.jstor.org/participate--jstor/individuals/early-journal--content. JSTOR is a digital library of academic journals, books, and primary source objects. JSTOR helps people discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content through a powerful research and teaching platform, and preserves this content for future generations. JSTOR is part of ITHAKA, a not--for--profit organization that also includes Ithaka S+R and Portico. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org. rel resulted in the pruning of over two hundred branches. A great many other trees showed equal evidence of the relish of squirrels for the seed, which they all obtained in the same wasteful manner; but this destruction can last only a short time, as the fruit falls very promptly when ripe. WM. TRELEASE. Madison, Wis., May 24. rel resulted in the pruning of over two hundred branches. A great many other trees showed equal evidence of the relish of squirrels for the seed, which they all obtained in the same wasteful manner; but this destruction can last only a short time, as the fruit falls very promptly when ripe. WM. TRELEASE. Madison, Wis., May 24. rel resulted in the pruning of over two hundred branches. A great many other trees showed equal evidence of the relish of squirrels for the seed, which they all obtained in the same wasteful manner; but this destruction can last only a short time, as the fruit falls very promptly when ripe. WM. TRELEASE. Madison, Wis., May 24. The claims of political science. Is there any valid reason why political science should not take its natural place among the sciences? That it has no such place is evident from the fact that it is almost wholly excluded from all the scientific journals that profess to be devoted to all the sciences. How many articles on political science have ever appeared in the American journal of science, in Nature, in Science ? Can any other science be named of which the same can be said? It seems to be assuned that all that is ever said about national affairs must necessarily be of a partisan character, and be said, not for the sake of truth, but to serve some political party or private interest. Yet any one who has any faith in humanity must admit that a large amount of disinterested political work is being done. Those who deny this for the present will generally admit it for the past, and the present is always becoming the past. But, even if this were not the case, it would still be true that scientific politics is theoretically possible. Most sciences are more or less practical; i.e., they furnish the principles which underlie the useful arts. From pure science to pure art there are always three somewhat distinct steps. The first is the discovery of scientific principles; the second is the invention of the methods of applying these principles; and the third is the actual application of the principles. The first two or the last two of these steps may sometimes be so intimately blended as to render it difficult to detect the line of de-! marcation between them; but _ theoretically the three steps are always present. If, therefore, there is a politi-' " cal science, this must also be \ \\x true of it. We will assume that there is such a science; that the operations of a state constitute a department of natural phenomena, which, like other natural phenomena, take place according to uniform laws. The pure <. . . science, then, consists in the discovery of these laws. The intermediate, or inventive, stage =-= embraces the devising of methods for controlling the phenomena so as to cause them to follow advantageous channels, just as water, wind, and electricity are controlled. The third stage is simply the carrying-out of the methods thus devised. Political science is one of the cases in which, in its present state at least, the first and second steps are very much blended. They are both embraced in legislation, which includes both discovery and invention. Yet the pure investigator is not entirely wanting; and the ideal politician or statesman would correctly represent the first stage, or pure political science. The executive branch of government fairly coincides with the third, or pure art, stage. The judiciary is properly legislative or inventive; but, in fact, it often performs executive or technologic functions.
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