COGNITIVE LINGUISTICS AND THE POETICS OF TIME: IS 9/11 A CONCEPTUAL METAPHOR, A CONCEPTUAL METONYMY OR BOTH?*

Adan Martín, Juani Guerra
unpublished
1. What is 9/11, linguistically speaking? Intuitively, we might interpret 9/11 as a simple date. Like most languages, English has a tendency to abbreviate dates in this way, and 9/11 univocally refers to the eleventh day of September. However, the typical referent of this temporal expression is the 11 th of September 2001. Furthermore, neither in speech nor in writing do we usually allude to dates by means of this kind of abbreviation. Dates written in their abbreviated notational form do not
more » ... ually appear within full sentences. When dates are included in the body of the text, it is usual to have a more analytic paraphrase, as exemplified in: (1) My birthday is on 18 th December (spoken 'the eighteenth of December') The time expression 9/11, unlike the above expression, is highly entrenched in language. Indeed, orally, 9/11 is spoken with a 'literal' recitation of the figures: nine eleven and not with a 'transformed' reading. This leads to the feeling that something is being highlighted when that particular temporal reference is employed. There are different ways of writing and saying dates in English, as style guides and most TEFL manuals propose. In general, and despite tendencies towards mixed usage in date format, two main variants are identifiable. Conventionally, in British
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