Peer Review #4 of "Diversity and evolution of the endosymbionts of Bemisia tabaci in China (v0.2)" [peer_review]

2018 unpublished
The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is a cryptic species complex, including members that are pests of global importance. This study presents a screening of B. tabaci species in China for infection by the primary endosymbiont, Portiera aleyrodidarum, and two secondary endosymbionts, Arsenophonus and Cardinium . The results showed that P. aleyrodidarum was detected in all B. tabaci individuals, while Arsenophonus was abundant in indigenous species of B. tabaci Asia II
more » ... f B. tabaci Asia II 1, Asia II 3 and China 1 but absent in the invasive species, Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1); Cardinium presented in the Mediterranean (MED), Asia II 1 and Asia II 3 species but was rarely detected in the MEAM1 and China 1 species. Moreover, phylogenetic analyses revealed that the P. aleyrodidarum and mtCO1 (mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1) phylograms were similar and corresponding with the five distinct cryptic species clades to some extent, probably indicating an ancient infection followed by vertical transmission and subsequent co-evolutionary diversification. In contrast, the phylogenetic trees of Arsenophonus and Cardinium were incongruent with the mtCO1 phylogram, potentially indicating horizontal transmission in B. tabaci cryptic species complex. Taken together, our study showed the distinct infection status of endosymbionts in invasive and indigenous whiteflies; we also probably indicated the co-evolution of primary endosymbiont and its host as well as potential horizontal transfer of secondary endosymbionts. PeerJ reviewing PDF | Abstract 20 The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is a cryptic species complex, 21 including members that are pests of global importance. This study presents a screening of B. tabaci 22 species in China for infection by the primary endosymbiont, Portiera aleyrodidarum, and two 23 secondary endosymbionts, Arsenophonus and Cardinium. The results showed that P. 24 aleyrodidarum was detected in all B. tabaci individuals, while Arsenophonus was abundant in 25 indigenous species of B. tabaci Asia II 1, Asia II 3 and China 1 but absent in the invasive species, 26 Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1); Cardinium presented in the Mediterranean (MED), Asia II 27 1 and Asia II 3 species but was rarely detected in the MEAM1 and China 1 species. Moreover, 28 phylogenetic analyses revealed that the P. aleyrodidarum and mtCO1 (mitochondrial cytochrome 29 oxidase 1) phylograms were similar and corresponding with the five distinct cryptic species clades 30 to some extent, probably indicating an ancient infection followed by vertical transmission and 31 subsequent co-evolutionary diversification. In contrast, the phylogenetic trees of Arsenophonus 32 and Cardinium were incongruent with the mtCO1 phylogram, potentially indicating horizontal 33 transmission in B. tabaci cryptic species complex. Taken together, our study showed the distinct 34 infection status of endosymbionts in invasive and indigenous whiteflies; we also probably 35 indicated the co-evolution of primary endosymbiont and its host as well as potential horizontal 36 transfer of secondary endosymbionts. 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 PeerJ reviewing PDF |
doi:10.7287/peerj.5516v0.2/reviews/4 fatcat:tmfdtugbnjhodnnsqgq4hnp43e