An examination of skewed health expenditure data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS)

William W. Yu, Steven R. Machlin
2005 Journal of Economic and Social Measurement  
Objectives: This study compared the socioeconomic status, medical use and expenditures for infants (1-5 years), juveniles (6-12 years), and adolescents (13-19 years) with a chronic condition or disease to determine factors affecting health spending. Methods: Data from 3,677 minors (< 20 years old, without disabilities) were extracted from the Korea Health Panel (2015) database. Results: Minors with chronic conditions or diseases were older (juveniles, and adolescents; p < 0.001), and included a
more » ... 01), and included a higher proportion of Medicaid recipients (p = 0.004), a higher use of hospital outpatient care (p < 0.001), and higher medical expenditure (p < 0.001) compared to minors without chronic conditions or diseases. Boys were more likely to have a chronic condition or disease than girls (p = 0.036). Adolescents and juveniles were more likely than infants to have a chronic condition or disease (p = 0.001). Medicaid recipients were more likely to have a chronic condition or disease than those who were not Medicaid recipients (p = 0.008). Minors who had been hospital outpatients were more likely to have a chronic condition or disease, compared with minors who had not been an outpatient (p = 0.001). Having a chronic condition or disease, was a factor increasing medical expenditure (p = 0.001). Medical expenditure was higher in infants than in juveniles and adolescents (p = 0.001). Infants had higher rates of medical use when compared with juveniles and adolescents (p = 0.001). Conclusion: These findings suggest that systematic health care management for minors with chronic conditions or diseases, is needed.
doi:10.3233/jem-2005-0246 fatcat:enpgch3ucfdifkww7cgmty4c2e