ON OBLIQUE FRACTURE OF THE HEAD OF THE HUMERUS

Alexander Ogston
1876 The Lancet  
491 process proceeded. In one, however, it attained so great a I predominance that the tracing could not have ben distinguished from one of the second stage of asphyxia. The record (Fig. 7) affords evidence of complete abolition of the normal element, but even here it could he seen, by watching I the laryngeal movements, that the automatic centre was I not entirely paralysed; for its inspiratury mandate, though it was neglected by the diaphragm, was punctually obeyeri by the posterior
more » ... posterior crico-arytenoid muscles, which, at the proper moment, opened the glottis, fruitlessly of course, with the same precision as ever. As the expiratory closure of the glottis was immediately preceded by the spasmodic inspiration, it is obvious that this happened at a moment which, if respiration bad been normal, would have coincided with the respiratory pause.
doi:10.1016/s0140-6736(02)21257-x fatcat:efeeietk4zhxveqkzakynb6kfi