Clinical pharmacist-led educational tool effect on pediatric patients with epilepsy in Jordan [post]

Suha Jarad, Amal Akour, Wael Khreisat, Afrah El-Shammari
2021 unpublished
Aim: To investigate the effect of a clinical pharmacist-led educational tool on pediatric patients with epilepsy in Jordan. Specifically on the efficacy, safety, adherence to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), satisfaction with information about AEDs provided to the caregivers, and quality of life (QoL). Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial where pediatric patients were randomly assigned to the intervention (n=41) or the control (n=40) group. 30-minute clinical pharmacist-led educational
more » ... -led educational interview to the parent/caregiver was provided to the intervention group as add-on to standard medical care received by the control group. Efficacy was measured by number of seizure-free patients, while epilepsy specific questionnaires were used to evaluate safety, adherence, satisfaction with information about AEDs and QoL; measured at baseline and after 8-week follow-up. Results: The intervention group had 63.9% seizure free patients at follow up vs. 31.7% at baseline (P-value <0.001), and the control group had 48.6% at follow up vs. 27.5% at baseline (P-value <0.05); with no significant difference between groups (P- value > 0.05). At follow-up, mean pediatric epilepsy side effects questionnaire (PESQ) score was reduced in the intervention group (P-value <0.001), and increased in the control group (P-value <0.001); with no significant difference between groups (P-value=0.08). While the intervention group had a significant higher mean score of adherence (P-value <0.0001), and higher satisfaction with information (P-value <0.0001), and a higher QoL (P-value <0.05). There was a significant positive correlation between satisfaction and adherence (r=0.682, P-value < 0.0001), satisfaction and QoL (r=0.298, P-value < 0.05), adherence and QoL (r=0.323, P-value < 0.01). While, satisfaction and safety, safety and QoL correlated significantly and negatively (r=-0.263, P-value < 0.05 and r=-0.782, P-value < 0.0001, respectively) Conclusion: Clinical pharmacist-led educational tool had a positive outcome on pediatric patients with epilepsy with regard to efficacy, safety, adherence, satisfaction with information about AEDs and QoL.
doi:10.22541/au.161277696.69995842/v1 fatcat:xb6rv6sny5dwvalqhitmces3wq