Dietary Patterns among Colorectal Cancer Patients in Southwest of Iran: A Cross-Sectional Study

Razieh Choghakhori
2016 Gastroenterology & Hepatology Open Access  
Aim: To investigate any difference of dietary habits and food groups consumption between colorectal cancer patients and healthy subjects. Method: In these cross-sectional study 278 patients with colorectal cancer compared with 278 healthy subjects for viewpoint of Energy and nutrient intakes. Results: Mean age of participants at recruitment was 58.45±8.18 and 57.26±8.86 in colorectal cancer patients and control group, respectively. 54% of each group was female. 66.2% and 62.9% of participants
more » ... each group had never been smoker. There was no significant differences between colorectal cancer patients and matched healthy subjects based on demographic and anthropometric characteristics at baseline same as amount of energy intake (P=0.2). Healthy participants in control group consumed significantly (p<0.05) more carbohydrate and protein and also less fat (30% versus 32%), more saturated fat (29.22±4.94 vs. 24.1±5.53), less poly unsaturated fatty acid (8.24±4.5 vs 12.84±4.19, respectively) and more cereals in their daily diet in comparison with colorectal cancer patients. Also, they ate significantly more servings of vegetable and fruit as compared to the patients. Consumption of milk and dairy products did not differ significantly between two groups (p=0.07). Meat consumption was significantly (p<0.05) more frequent in cancerous group while they consumed significantly (p<0.05) less fish and poultry compared to the healthy group. Furthermore, colorectal cancer patients used significantly more confectionary products. Conclusion: Our data support the hypothesis that consumption of red meat and fat increases the risk of colon cancer while a dietary pattern that is richer in vegetables and lower in red meat reduces risk. This study confirms that in Iranian population suffered by colorectal cancer consume more red meat and fat and less vegetable and fruits similar to western countries. disease. Our data support the hypothesis that consumption of red meat and fat increases the risk of colon cancer while a dietary pattern that is richer in vegetables and lower in red meat reduces risk. This study confirms that in Iranian population suffered by colorectal cancer consume more red meat and fat and less vegetable and fruits similar to western countries.
doi:10.15406/ghoa.2016.04.00106 fatcat:gnc3p3xeerbztoqykw2x3iefrm