Animals of the past [book]

Frederic A. Lucas
1902 unpublished
Triceratops, 121 ; distinguishing characters of bones, 122 ; CONTENTS vii the skeleton a problem in mechanics, 124 ; clothing the bones with flesh, 127 ; the covering of animals, 127 ; outside ornamentation, 129 ; probabilities in the covering of animals, 130 ; impressions of extinct animals, 131 ; mistaken inferences from bones of Mammoth, 133 ; coloring of large land animals, 134 ; color markings of young animals, 136 ; references, 137. VIII. FEATHERED GIANTS Legend of the Moa, 139 ; our
more » ... Moa, 139 ; our knowledge of the Moas, 141 ; some Moas wingless, 142 ; deposits of Moa bones, 143 ; legend of the Roc, 144 ; discovery of iEpyornis, 145 ; largesounding names, 146 ; eggs of great birds, 147 ; the Patagonian Phororhacos, 149 ; the huge Brontornis, 150 ; development of giant birds, 153 ; distribution of flightless birds, 154 ; relation between flightlessness and size, 156 ; references, 156. IX. THE ANCESTRY OF THE HORSE North America in the Eocene age, 160 ; appearance of early horses, 163 ; early domestication of the horse, 165 ; the toes of horses, 166 ; Miocene horses small, 167 ; evidence of genealogy of the horse, 170; meaning of abnormalities, 170; changes in the cUmate and animals of the West, 174 ; references, 176. X. THE MAMMOTH The story of the killing of the Mammoth, 177 ; derivation of the word *' mammoth," 178 ; mistaken ideas as to size of the Mammoth, 179 ; size of Mammoth and modern elephants, 180 ; finding of an entire Mammoth, 182 ; birthplace of the Mammoth, 184 ; beliefs concerning its bones, 185 ; the range of the animal, 186 ; theories concerning the extinction of the Mammoth, 188 ; Man and Mammoth, 189 ; origin of the Alaskan Live Mammoth Story, 190; traits of the Innuits, 192 ; an entire Mammoth recently found, 194 ; references, 195. viii CONTENTS XL THE MASTODON Differences between Mastodon and Mammoth, 198 ; affinities of the Mastodon, 200 ; vestigial structures, 201 ; distribution of American Mastodon, 203 ; first noticed in North America, 204 ; thought to be carnivorous, 206 ; Koch's Missourium, 208 ; former abundance of Mastodons, 209 ; appearance of the animal, 210; its size, 211 ; was man contemporary with Mastodon? 213; the Lenape stone, 215; legend of the big buffalo, 216 ; references, 218. XII. WHY DO ANIMALS BECOME EXTINCT.? Extinction sometimes evolution, 221 ; over-specialization as a cause for extinction, 222 ; extinction sometimes unaccountable, 223 ; man's capability for harm small in the past, 224 ; old theories of great convulsions, 226 ; changes in nature slow, 227 ; the case of Lingula, 228 ; local extermination, 229 ; the Moas and the Great Auk, 232 ; the case of large animals, 233 ; interdependence of living beings, 234 ; coyotes and fruit, 236 ; Shaler on the Miocene flora of Europe, 236 ; man's desire for knowledge, 238. Index^243 estimated size, 66 teeth, 65, 61 Carson City footprints, 45 Casts, how formed, 10, 11 Cats and clover, 234
doi:10.5962/bhl.title.20121 fatcat:wgqsafxkybahnghtpc53ydj3xm