Peer Review #1 of "Identification and expression profiles of candidate chemosensory receptors in Histia rhodope (Lepidoptera: Zygaenidae) (v0.2)" [peer_review]

N Montagné
2020 unpublished
Insect olfaction and vision play important roles in survival and reproduction. Diurnal butterflies mainly rely on visual cues whereas nocturnal moths rely on olfactory signals to locate external resources. Histia rhodope Cramer (Lepidoptera: Zygaenidae) is an important pest of the landscape tree Bischofia polycarpa in China and other Southeast Asian regions. As a diurnal moth, H. rhodope represents a suitable model for studying the evolutionary shift from olfactory to visual communication.
more » ... communication. However, only a few chemosensory soluble proteins have been characterized and information on H. rhodope chemoreceptor genes is currently lacking. In this study, we identified 45 odorant receptors (ORs), 9 ionotropic receptor s (IRs), 8 gustatory receptors (GRs) and 2 sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs) from our previously acquired H. rhodope antennal transcriptomic data. The number of chemoreceptors of H. rhodope was less compared with that found in many nocturnal moths. Some specific chemoreceptors such as OR coreceptor (ORco), ionotropic receptor co-receptor, CO 2 receptor, sugar receptors and bitter receptors were predicted by phylogenetic analysis. Notably, two candidate pheromone receptors (PRs) were identified within a novel PR lineage. qRT-PCR results showed that almost all tested genes (22/24) were predominantly expressed in antennae, indicating that they may be important in olfactory function. Among these antennae-enriched genes, 6 ORs, 5 IRs and 2 GRs displayed female-biased expression, while 2 ORs displayed malebiased expression. Additionally, HrhoIR75q.2 and HrhoGR67 were more highly expressed in heads and legs. This study enriches the olfactory gene inventory of H. rhodope and provides the foundation for further research of the chemoreception mechanism in diurnal moths. Manuscript to be reviewed 42 Abstract 43 Insect olfaction and vision play important roles in survival and reproduction. Diurnal butterflies 44 mainly rely on visual cues whereas nocturnal moths rely on olfactory signals to locate external 45 resources. Histia rhodope Cramer (Lepidoptera: Zygaenidae) is an important pest of the 46 landscape tree Bischofia polycarpa in China and other Southeast Asian regions. As a diurnal 47 moth, H. rhodope represents a suitable model for studying the evolutionary shift from olfactory 48 to visual communication. However, only a few chemosensory soluble proteins have been 49 characterized and information on H. rhodope chemoreceptor genes is currently lacking. In this 50 study, we identified 45 odorant receptors (ORs), 9 ionotropic receptors (IRs), 8 gustatory 51 receptors (GRs) and 2 sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs) from our previously 52 acquired H. rhodope antennal transcriptomic data. The number of chemoreceptors of H. rhodope 53 was less compared with that found in many nocturnal moths. Some specific chemoreceptors such 54 as OR co-receptor (ORco), ionotropic receptor co-receptor, CO 2 receptor, sugar receptors and 55 bitter receptors were predicted by phylogenetic analysis. Notably, two candidate pheromone 56 receptors (PRs) were identified within a novel PR lineage. qRT-PCR results showed that almost 57 all tested genes (22/24) were predominantly expressed in antennae, indicating that they may be 58 important in olfactory function. Among these antennae-enriched genes, 6 ORs, 5 IRs and 2 GRs 59 displayed female-biased expression, while 2 ORs displayed male-biased expression. 60 Additionally, HrhoIR75q.2 and HrhoGR67 were more highly expressed in heads and legs. This 61 study enriches the olfactory gene inventory of H. rhodope and provides the foundation for 62 further research of the chemoreception mechanism in diurnal moths.
doi:10.7287/peerj.10035v0.2/reviews/1 fatcat:msyczjsxw5d37jffhbbye4tuii