Estrogen suppresses brain mitochondrial oxidative stress in female and male rats

Ali Razmara, Sue P. Duckles, Diana N. Krause, Vincent Procaccio
2007 Brain Research  
Mitochondria are a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress, key contributors to aging and neurodegenerative disorders. We report that gonadal hormones influence brain mitochondrial ROS production in both females and males. Initial experiments showed that estrogen decreases mitochondrial superoxide production in a receptor-mediated manner, as measured by MitoSOX fluorescence in differentiated PC-12 cells. We then assessed in vivo effects of gonadal hormones on brain
more » ... ochondrial oxidative stress in female and male rats. Brain mitochondria were isolated to measure a functional indicator of ROS, i.e., activity of the ROS-sensitive mitochondrial enzyme, aconitase. Gonadectomy of both males and females caused a decrease in aconitase activity, suggesting endogenous gonadal hormones influence mitochondrial ROS production in the brain. In vivo treatment of gonadectomized animals with testosterone or dihydrotestosterone (DHT) had no effect, but estrogen replacement significantly increased aconitase activity in brain mitochondria from both female and male rats. This indicates estrogen decreases brain mitochondrial ROS production in vivo. Sex hormone treatments did not affect protein levels of brain mitochondrial uncoupling proteins (UCP-2, 4, and 5). However, estrogen did increase the activity, but not the levels, of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), the mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes superoxide radical breakdown, in brain mitochondria from both female and male rats. Thus, in contrast to the lack of effect of androgens on mitochondrial ROS, estrogen suppression of mitochondrial oxidative stress may influence neurological disease incidence and progression in both females and males.
doi:10.1016/j.brainres.2007.08.036 pmid:17889838 pmcid:PMC2099309 fatcat:6mbbct6nhnfefer3ab5fugevgq