THE SERVICES

1903 The Lancet  
1542 VITAL STATISTICS.-THE SERVICES. which had been 283, 260, and 225 in the three preceding weeks, further declined last week to 182, and were 34 below the number in the corresponding period of last year. The causes of 48. or 1'1 1 per cent., of the deaths in the 76 large towns last week were not certified either by a registered medical practitioner or by a coroner. All the causes of death were duly certified in West Ham, Bristol, Nottingham, Bolton, Salford, Newcastle-on-Tyne, and in 44 other
more » ... ne, and in 44 other smaller towns ; the largest proportions of uncertified deaths were registered in Hanley, Smethwick, Barrow-in-Furness, Sheffield, and South Shields. HEALTH OF SCOTCH TOWNS. The annual rate of mortality in eight of the principal Scotch towns, which had been 19'2, 17 9, and 18 0 per 1000 in the three preceding weeks, declined again to 17° 2 per 1000 during the week ending May 23rd, but showed an excess of 1 7 per 1000 over the mean rate during the same period in the 76 large English towns. The rates in the eight Scotch towns ranged from 13 4 in Dundee and 14'6 6 in Edinburgh to 18'6 6 in Glasgow and in Perth and 23'3 in Greenock. The 563 deaths in these towns included 22 which were referred to whooping-cough, 16 to diarrhoea, six to measles, three to diphtheria, three to "fever, and one to scarlet fever, but not one to small-pox. In all, 51 deaths resulted from these principal infectious diseases last week, against 57, 57, and 68 in the three preceding weeks. These 51 deaths were equal to an annual rate of 1 6 per 1000, which corresponded with the mean rate last week from the same diseases in the 76 large English towns. The fatal cases of whoopingcough, which had been 32, 26, and 25 in the three preceding weeks, further declined last week to 22, of which 13 occurred in Glasgow, three in Edinburgh, three in Greenock, and two in Leith. The deaths from diarrhoea, which had been 11 and 12 in the two preceding weeks, further rose to 16 last week, and included 10 in Glasgow, two in Dundee, and two in Aberdeen. The fatal cases of measles, which had been seven, eight, and 16 in the three preceding weeks, declined again last week to six, of which three were registered in Glasgow and two in Edinburgh. The deaths from diphtheria, which had been five and six in the two preceding weeks, declined again to three last week and all occurred in Glasgow. The deaths referred to diseases of the respiratory organs in these towns, which had been 125, 104, and 101 in the three preceding weeks, increased to 102 last week, and were 54 below the number in the
doi:10.1016/s0140-6736(01)70436-9 fatcat:725npwm4c5fnzl5idi23gqnnw4