RADIATION DOSIMETRY FOR HIGHLY CONTAMINATED BELARUSIAN, RUSSIAN AND UKRAINIAN POPULATIONS, AND FOR LESS CONTAMINATED POPULATIONS IN EUROPE

André Bouville, Illya A. Likhtarev, Lina N. Kovgan, Victor F. Minenko, Sergei M. Shinkarev, Vladimir V. Drozdovitch
2007 Health Physics  
The explosions at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) in Ukraine early in the morning of 26 April 1986 led to a considerable release of radioactive materials during 10 d. The cloud from the reactor spread many different radionuclides, particularly those of iodine ( 131 I) and cesium ( 134 Cs and 137 Cs), over the majority of European countries, but the greatest contamination occurred over vast areas of Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine. As the major health effect of Chernobyl is
more » ... ct of Chernobyl is an elevated thyroid cancer incidence in children and adolescents, much attention has been paid to the thyroid doses resulting from intakes of 131 I, which were delivered within 2 mo following the accident. The thyroid doses received by the inhabitants of the contaminated areas of Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine varied in a wide range, mainly according to age, level of ground contamination, milk consumption rate, and origin of the milk that was consumed. Reported individual thyroid doses varied up to ϳ40,000 mGy, with average doses of a few to 1,000 mGy, depending on the area where people were exposed. In addition, the presence in the environment of long-lived 134 Cs and 137 Cs has led to a relatively homogeneous exposure of all organs and tissues of the body via external and internal irradiation, albeit at low rates. Excluding the thyroid doses, the whole-body (or effective) dose estimates for the general population accumulated during 20 y after the accident (1986 -2005) range from a few millisieverts (mSv) to some hundred mSv with an average dose of ϳ10 mSv in the contaminated areas of Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine. In other European countries, both the thyroid and the effective doses are, on average, much smaller. Health Phys. 93(5):487-501; 2007
doi:10.1097/01.hp.0000279019.23900.62 pmid:18049225 fatcat:nb7srx6yy5hrrgjgvarnrz6lre