DEGENERACY; ITS CAUSES AND PREVENTION

ARTHUR ROWLEY REYNOLDS
1896 Journal of the American Medical Association  
censure of the principals and teachers by the parents complaining that their children had been unnecessarily retarded in their grades. We must be more active and alert in this direction, and not until we, as a body, take a more decided stand, can we hope to successfully stem the rapidly advancing tide of both organic and functional nervous diseases. If it be true that the physiologic nerve cell is limited in its capacity, and that its normal activity results in the expenditure of a certain
more » ... e of a certain amount of force which, when discharged, presents changes corresponding to fatigue, and that a certain amount of rest is not only capable but necessary to restore or regenerate its normal function, in the absence of which, changes corresponding to its inanition occur; then, clearly, the duty of the physician is to use all possible means to secure the needed rest for all morbid conditions of the nervous system in which nervous irritability and instability are the chief clinical criteria, and those which form so great a part or the sub-
doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430960025001f fatcat:spalwy655nbz7d2pcxnen5xuru