Effects of acute and chronic food restriction on the insulin-like growth factor axis in the guinea pig

A Sohlstrom
1998 Journal of Endocrinology  
The effect of fasting (17-18 h) versus food restriction (70% for 80 13 days) on the IGF-IGF binding protein (BP) axis in female guinea pigs was studied and related to body weight, weight gain and food conversion efficiency. Circulating IGF-I was reduced in the fasted (13%) and food-restricted (50%) animals. IGF-II was only decreased (61%) in the food-restricted group. There was no effect of fasting on IGFBP-1 to -4 while IGFBP-1, -3 and -4 were reduced by 56%, 60% and 44% respectively, and
more » ... pectively, and IGFBP-2 increased by 72%, in the food-restricted group. Food restriction reduced the relative sizes of fat depots, spleen, liver, thymus and heart, increased those of adrenals, kidneys, pancreas, gastrointestinal tract, M. Biceps, M. Soleus and brain while those of uterus, lungs, thyroids and M. Gastrocnemius were unchanged. IGFBP-1 and -2 were negatively correlated to weight gain and food conversion efficiency in the ad libitum-fed group, while IGF-I, -II, IGFBP-1, -3 and -4 were positively correlated to body weight, weight gain and food conversion efficiency in the food-restricted group. The results show that acute and chronic food restriction have different consequences for the IGF-IGFBP axis. Furthermore, IGF-II as well as IGF-I are implicated in the control of body weight, weight gain and food conversion efficiency under conditions of restricted nutrition. Finally, IGFBP-1 and -2 may have different roles during chronic undernutrition compared with unrestrained nutrition in adult life.
doi:10.1677/joe.0.1570107 pmid:9614364 fatcat:bjsnl2z4szeu7gsvtartfobbra