CONTENTS OF PHYLLOQUINONE AND MENAQUINONE FAMILY IN SERUM AND FECES FROM HUMAN NEWBORN INFANTS

A SHIRAHATA, A ASAKURA, T NAKAMURA, K YAMADA
1987 DIET   unpublished
A sensitive and specific method for the determination of phylloquinone (PK) and menaquinone families (MK-n), between MK-4 and MK-10, was developed. Vitamin K (VK) was extracted from serum and feces with n-hexane-ether, and purified with silica gel column and short alumina column. Eluted VK was separated by high performance liquid chromatography using Cosmosil 5 Cie column with ethanol-water as a mobile phase. The separated VK was detected by a fluorometry after its reaction with ethanolic
more » ... boro-hydride in a reaction coil connected by one-line to a chromatographic column. Minimum detectable quantities of PK, MK-4 and MK-7 were 0.1, 0.1 and 0.15 ng/ml, respectively.In normal adult serum, PK, MK-4, MK-5, MK-6, MK-7 and MK-8 were detected. The meaniSD values of PK and MK-n from normal adult serum were 3.0±1.4 (PK), 0.3±0.2 (MK-4), 0.9±0.4 (MK-5), 0.3 ±0.3 (MK-6), 3.8±1.4 (MK-7) and 0.3±0.2 (MK-8)ng/ml, respectively. On the other hand, VK was not detected in 19 umbilical blood samples, excluding 3 samples in which 0.7, 1.0 and 2.5 ng/ml of PK were detected. In 7 healthy newborn infants under 8 days of age, VK was not detected excluding 3 cases. Of these 3 cases, in one case, 3.16 ng/ml of PK was detected, and in the other two cases, 1.1 and 1.5 ng/ml of MK-7 were detected. In 11 infants at one month of age, PK ( 10 cases ) and MK-7 ( 5 cases ) were detected, and mean+SD values of PK and MK-7 in the detected group were 0.55±0.44 and 0.62±0.18 ng/ml, respectively. VK was not detected in plasma of infants with primary hemorrhagic disease of the newborn ( 4 cases ) and infantile vitamin K deficiency ( 2 cases ). With a wide variation of VK content in each samlpe, PK and all MK families were detected in feces from normal adults. On the other hand, only PK and MK-7 were detected in meconium collected from 6 normal newborn infants before initial feeding. The contents of VK in meconium were less than one percent of those in adult feces. These results indicate that VK supply from maternal side in utero and from intestinal flora after birth is very poor in newborn infants.
doi:10.1055/s-0038-1643605 fatcat:wlpygyiikfh6lbbgifa3c764uy