Peer Review #2 of "Association of trait and specific hopes: cross sectional study on students and workers of health professions in Split, Croatia (v0.1)" [peer_review]

S Wayland
2016 unpublished
Hope (hoping) is most commonly assessed as a dispositional trait and associated with quality of life, self-care agency and non-attempts of suicide. However, little research has been conducted on hoping for specific events. Materials and Methods: We distributed a survey consisting of Integrative Hope Scale (HIS) and visual analogue scales on which respondents could declare their levels (intensity) of hope for specific events, to all first year health students enrolled at the University
more » ... niversity Department of Health Studies, Split, Croatia in 2011/12, as well as to working health professionals attending a nursing conference in April 2012.Results: A total of 161 (89.4%) students and 88 (89.8%) working health professionals returned the completed questionnaires. We found high trait hope scores of students and working health professionals (Md=111, 95% CI 109-113 vs. Md=115, 95% CI 112-119; U=5353, P=0.065), and weak to moderate correlations of trait and specific hopes (r=0.18 to 0.48, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient). Students and workers reported 31 different things they hoped for most in life, of which the most prevalent were being healthy and happy. There was very little agreement between participants' reported influence of the four factors compromising the trait hope (selfconfidence, ambition, optimism, and social support) on their specific hopes. Conclusions: Our findings, while strengthening the validity of hope as a trait, indicate that specific hopes of individuals are moderated by factors not captured by the IHS trait scale. Further research should explore specific hoping in detail, as well as the effectiveness of interventions aimed at increasing specific or generalized hoping. PeerJ reviewing PDF | Abstract 25 Introduction: Hope (hoping) is most commonly assessed as a dispositional trait and associated 26 with quality of life, self-care agency and non-attempts of suicide. However, little research has 27 been conducted on hoping for specific events. 28 Materials and Methods: We distributed a survey consisting of Integrative Hope Scale (IHS) 29 and visual analogue scales on which respondents could declare their levels (intensity) of hope for 30 specific events, to all first year health students enrolled at the University Department of Health 31 Studies, Split, Croatia in 2011/12, as well as to working health professionals attending a nursing 32 conference in April 2012. 33 Results: A total of 161 (89.4%) students and 88 (89.8%) working health professionals returned 34 the completed questionnaires. We found high trait hope scores of students and working health 35 professionals (Md=111, 95% CI 109-113 vs. Md=115, 95% CI 112-119; U=5353, P=0.065), and 36 weak to moderate correlations of trait and specific hopes (r=0.18 to 0.48, Spearman's rank 37 correlation coefficient). Students and workers reported 31 different things they hoped for most in 38 life, of which the most prevalent were being healthy and happy. There was very little agreement 39 between participants' reported influence of the four factors compromising the trait hope (self-40 confidence, ambition, optimism, and social support) on their specific hopes. 41 Conclusions: Our findings, while strengthening the validity of hope as a trait, indicate that 42 specific hopes of individuals are moderated by factors not captured by the IHS trait scale. Further 43 research should explore specific hoping in detail, as well as the effectiveness of interventions 44 aimed at increasing specific or generalized hoping. PeerJ reviewing PDF |
doi:10.7287/peerj.1604v0.1/reviews/2 fatcat:nyqlth7qfvgrhnt4b6swaqaypq