correlation of vitamin D levels with CD4+ T cells count in children with HIV infection

Vivi Sinulingga, Rita Evalina, Dr. Aridamuriany
2020 International Journal of Research Publications  
Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has become a serious issue in the field of child health. Faster disease progression, higher mortality, higher mother-to-child transmission, lower CD4+ T cells, and slower CD4+ increases after antiretroviral use are associated with vitamin D deficiency in HIV infection. Objective: To find out the correlation between vitamin D levels in the blood with CD4+ T cells count in children with HIV infection who received ART at Adam Malik General Hospital
more » ... . Method: This study used an analytic observational design with a cross-sectional approach to see the correlation between vitamin D levels in the blood and CD4+ T cell counts in children with HIV infection who received ART more than one year. The vitamin D and CD4+ count classification is based on WHO criteria. The data collected was processed and analyzed with a 95% confidence interval and a significance of p <0.05 and analysis with the Pearson and Annova correlation test. Result: Of the 31 research subjects, 17 subjects were male (54.8%) and 14 subjects were female (45.2%). The percentage of male is 9.6% more than that of women. With a standard deviation of 3.7 years, the age of the research subjects had a mean value of 8.8 years. Anthropometric measurements showed that 18 subjects (58.1%) were subjects with good nutritional status, while 13 subjects (41.9%) were malnourished. The CD4+ T cell count had a mean value 25 % and 899 sel/mm 2 and mean value of vitamin D mean value 21.8 ng/dl. There was a poor correlation (r 0.152), which was not significantly different (p = 0.141), between vitamin D levels and CD4+ cells count. Conclusion: There was no correlation between vitamin D levels and CD4+ T cells count in children with HIV infection who received ART at Adam Malik General Hospital Medan. Further studies with more severe deficiency or severe immunodeficiency are needed, which cannot be represented in this study.
doi:10.47119/ijrp1006411120201528 fatcat:w47snx2mr5bn5pg5jrfnb5d66u