Validation of Hebrew Versions of the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory, Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Function Questionnaire, and the Urgency, Severity and Impact Questionnaire

Lior Lowenstein, Gil Levy, Keren Or Chen, Shimon Ginath, Alex Condrea, Anna Padoa
2012 Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery  
Objective: Validated objective tools in the native languages of investigated populations are important for evaluating effects of medical disorders and treatments. The aim of our study was to validate a Hebrew version of the validated questionnaires commonly used in the field of urogynecology. Methods: This is a 2-step, prospective, multicenter study. Using a back-translation method, Hebrew-language versions of the following questionnaires were developed: Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory, Pelvic
more » ... Inventory, Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Function Questionnaire, and the Urgency, Severity and Impact Questionnaire. The questionnaires were administered in both Hebrew and English to 56 bilingual patients with pelvic organ prolapse and/or urinary incontinence. To test reliability, the participants were asked to refill the questionnaires in Hebrew 2 weeks later. Scores from the Hebrew and English versions were compared, using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Correlations between versions were assessed by the Spearman test. P G 0.05 or less was considered significant. Results: Scores from the Hebrew and English versions were found to be highly correlated, Q = 0.61Y0.96; P G 0.001. No differences in total scores were detected between the 2 versions of the 3 questionnaires and their subcategories (P 9 0.05). Cronbach alpha values were good (0.65Y096) for all questionnaires. Scores were highly correlated when the patients refilled the questionnaires in Hebrew (Q = 0.81Y0.98; P G 0.001). Conclusions: This study provides validated Hebrew versions of 3 well-accepted pelvic floor questionnaires. These questionnaires will enable standardization when assessing women with pelvic floor dysfunction.
doi:10.1097/spv.0b013e31827268fa pmid:23143424 fatcat:7j5uyi5ahbhx3lvamie3pnxkwm