THE SERVICES

1896 The Lancet  
The annual rate of mortality in the eight Scotch towns, which had declined in the three preceding weeks from 20-1 to 18'8 per 1000, rose again to 19-1 during the week ending Feb. 15th, but was slightly below the mean rate during the same period in the thirty-three large English towns. The rates in the eight Scotch towns ranged from 11'9 in Leith and 13-6 in Paisley to 20.0 in Glasgow and 24'4 in Greenock. The 557 deaths in these towns included 30 which were referred to whooping-cough, 14 to
more » ... rhcea, 7 to scarlet fever, 5 to measles, 5 to diphtheria, 5 to "fever," and not one to small-pox. In all, 66 deaths resulted from these principal zymotic diseases, against 79 and 77 in the two preceding weeks. These 66 deaths were equal to an annual rate of 2'3 per 1000, and was slightly below the mean rate last week from the same diseases in the thirty-three large English towns. The fatal cases of whooping-cough, which had been 37 and 32 in the two preceding weeks, further declined to 30 last week, of which 18 occurred in Glasgow, and 3 each in Dundee, Aberdeen, and Greenock. The deaths referred to scarlet fever, which had been 10 and 6 in the two preceding weeks, were 7 last week, and included 3 in Aberdeen and 2 in Glasgow. The 5 fatal cases of measles showed a slight further increase upon recent weekly numbers, and included 3 in Edinburgh. The deaths referred to different forms of "fever," which had increased in the three preceding weeks from 3 to 8, declined again to 5 last week, of which 3 were recorded in Edinburgh and 2 in Glasgow. The fatal cases of diphtheria, which had been 6 and 10 in the two preceding weeks, declined to 5 last week, and included 3 in Glasgow and 2 in Dundee. The deaths from diseases of the respiratory organs in these towns, which had been 116 and 106 in the two preceding weeks, were 105 last week, and were less than one-third of the high number recorded in the corresponding week of last year. The causes of 40, or more than 7 per cent., of the deaths in these eight towns last week were not certified. HEALTH OF DUBLIN. The death-rate in Dublin, which had declined in the three preceding weeks from 27-4 to 24-6 per 1000, further fell to 22-5 during the week ending Feb. 15th. During the past seven weeks of the current quarter the death-rate in the city has averaged 25-8 per 1000, the rate during the same period being 19 2 in London and 16 9 in Edinburgh. The 151 deaths registered in Dublin during the week under notice showed a decline of 14 from the number in the preceding week, and included 8 which were referred to the principal zymotic diseases, against 7 and 10 in the two preceding weeks; of these, 3 resulted from "fever," 2 from whooping-cough, 2 from scarlet fever, 1 from diarrhoea, but not one either from small-pox, measles, or diphtheria. These 8 deaths were equal to an annual rate of 1-2 per 1000, the zymotic death-rate during the same period being 2'9 in London and 1'5 in Edinburgh. The deaths referred to different forms of "fever," which had declined from 6 to 2 in the three preceding weeks, rose again to 3 last week. The 2 fatal cases of whooping-cough corresponded with the number in each of the two preceding weeks ; and the 2 deaths referred to scarlet fever exceeded the number recorded in any recent week. The 151 deaths in Dublin last week included 23 of infants under one year of age, and 39 of persons aged upwards of sixty years; the deaths both of infants and of elderly persons showed a decline from the numbers recorded in the preceding week. Six inquest cases and 3 deaths from violence were registered; and 44, or more than a fourth, of the deaths occurred in public institutions. The causes of 13, or nearly 9 per cent., of the deaths in the city last week were not certified.
doi:10.1016/s0140-6736(01)93254-4 fatcat:l4gey6jwafbcvkmwoipxp2rtey