A Lightning Stroke

J. H.
1892 Science  
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more » ... out Early Journal Content at http://about.jstor.org/participate--jstor/individuals/early-journal--content. JSTOR is a digital library of academic journals, books, and primary source objects. JSTOR helps people discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content through a powerful research and teaching platform, and preserves this content for future generations. JSTOR is part of ITHAKA, a not--for--profit organization that also includes Ithaka S+R and Portico. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org. 66 SCIE of the thorax and;abdomen, so as to assist the tidal movement of air outwards and inwards. I may add that one of Chun's figures (copied in the paper in Am. Nat.) correctly represents the spirals of Eristalis, giving even the external slits, highly magnified; but he misinterprets the slits, and takes them to be longitudinal ridges on what he supposes are solid threads. I have also pleasure in learning that my young friend, Professor H. T. Fernald of Pennsylvania Agricultural College, after reading my paper in 1884, stained and cut fine sections of Passulus cornutus and thus shows the spirals to be a set of hollow grooves enclosing some of the stained hypodermis which secretes and surrounds the tracheae. Princeton College, Jan. 21. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR. *** Correspondents are requested to be as brief as possible. The writer's nam is in all cases required as proof of good faith. On request in advance, one hundreJ copies of the number containing his communication will be furnishedfree to any correspondent. The editor will be glad to publish any queries consonant with the character of the journal. A Lightning Stroke. ON the 30th of May, 1881, a party of ladies and gentlemen went in an omnibus from Washington to the country seat of a friend (H. C. Metzerott's), distant nine miles, in Prince George's County, Md. During the afternoon the party was seated on the spacious veranda of the dwelling, the horses and omnibus standing on the lawn immediately to the front. Suddenly a few clouds gathered, and, before any rain fell, a severe and sudden clap of thunder startled them. At the same instant a flash or streak of lightning descended and ripped apart the south-west corner of the roof of the frame carriage house standing alone about two hundred feet distant, descended down the sheathing to midway of the west, or end, wall of the carriage house, then at right angles apparently to the centre of the wall where the clap-boarding was ripped and shattered; then struck a brass-tipped pair of shafts standing near the north-west angle, shattering the right-hand shaft about midway, where a strip of iron covered with leather was placed to serve as a stay for the ,breeching strap; then apparently passed down and out at the floor by the closed door of the carriage house, where it was plainly seen by all the company moving along rapidly in small coils or circles up the road leading to the veranda, to the hoofs of the horses, playing around them with great velocity, and then apparently dissipated, no one could tell where. The horses were greatly agitated, fairly trembled, but did not move; and most of the company on the porch experienced a tingling, stinging sensation, but none were stunned. The sky soon cleared. SCIE of the thorax and;abdomen, so as to assist the tidal movement of air outwards and inwards. I may add that one of Chun's figures (copied in the paper in Am. Nat.) correctly represents the spirals of Eristalis, giving even the external slits, highly magnified; but he misinterprets the slits, and takes them to be longitudinal ridges on what he supposes are solid threads. I have also pleasure in learning that my young friend, Professor H. T. Fernald of Pennsylvania Agricultural College, after reading my paper in 1884, stained and cut fine sections of Passulus cornutus and thus shows the spirals to be a set of hollow grooves enclosing some of the stained hypodermis which secretes and surrounds the tracheae. Princeton College, Jan. 21. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR. *** Correspondents are requested to be as brief as possible. The writer's nam is in all cases required as proof of good faith. On request in advance, one hundreJ copies of the number containing his communication will be furnishedfree to any correspondent. The editor will be glad to publish any queries consonant with the character of the journal. A Lightning Stroke. ON the 30th of May, 1881, a party of ladies and gentlemen went in an omnibus from Washington to the country seat of a friend (H. C. Metzerott's), distant nine miles, in Prince George's County, Md. During the afternoon the party was seated on the spacious veranda of the dwelling, the horses and omnibus standing on the lawn immediately to the front. Suddenly a few clouds gathered, and, before any rain fell, a severe and sudden clap of thunder startled them. At the same instant a flash or streak of lightning descended and ripped apart the south-west corner of the roof of the frame carriage house standing alone about two hundred feet distant, descended down the sheathing to midway of the west, or end, wall of the carriage house, then at right angles apparently to the centre of the wall where the clap-boarding was ripped and shattered; then struck a brass-tipped pair of shafts standing near the north-west angle, shattering the right-hand shaft about midway, where a strip of iron covered with leather was placed to serve as a stay for the ,breeching strap; then apparently passed down and out at the floor by the closed door of the carriage house, where it was plainly seen by all the company moving along rapidly in small coils or circles up the road leading to the veranda, to the hoofs of the horses, playing around them with great velocity, and then apparently dissipated, no one could tell where. The horses were greatly agitated, fairly trembled, but did not move; and most of the company on the porch experienced a tingling, stinging sensation, but none were stunned. The sky soon cleared. SCIE of the thorax and;abdomen, so as to assist the tidal movement of air outwards and inwards. I may add that one of Chun's figures (copied in the paper in Am. Nat.) correctly represents the spirals of Eristalis, giving even the external slits, highly magnified; but he misinterprets the slits, and takes them to be longitudinal ridges on what he supposes are solid threads. I have also pleasure in learning that my young friend, Professor H. T. Fernald of Pennsylvania Agricultural College, after reading my paper in 1884, stained and cut fine sections of Passulus cornutus and thus shows the spirals to be a set of hollow grooves enclosing some of the stained hypodermis which secretes and surrounds the tracheae. Princeton College, Jan. 21. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR. *** Correspondents are requested to be as brief as possible. The writer's nam is in all cases required as proof of good faith. On request in advance, one hundreJ copies of the number containing his communication will be furnishedfree to any correspondent. The editor will be glad to publish any queries consonant with the character of the journal. A Lightning Stroke.
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