MRO/CRISM Retrieval of Surface Lambert Albedos for Multispectral Mapping of Mars With DISORT-Based Radiative Transfer Modeling: Phase 1—Using Historical Climatology for Temperatures, Aerosol Optical Depths, and Atmospheric Pressures

Patrick C. McGuire, Michael J. Wolff, Michael D. Smith, Raymond E. Arvidson, Scott L. Murchie, R. Todd Clancy, Ted L. Roush, Selby C. Cull, Kim A. Lichtenberg, Sandra M. Wiseman, Robert O. Green, Terry Z. Marti (+12 others)
2008 IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing  
We discuss the DISORT-based radiative transfer pipeline ("CRISM_LambertAlb") for atmospheric and thermal correction of MRO/CRISM data acquired in multispectral Manuscript The DISORT-based model takes the dust and ice aerosol optical depths (scaled to the CRISM wavelength range), the surface pressures (computed from MOLA altimetry, MGS-TES lower atmospheric thermometry, and Viking-based pressure climatology), the surface temperatures, the reconstructed instrumental photometric angles, and the
more » ... sured I/F spectrum as inputs, and then a Lambertian albedo spectrum is computed as the output. The Lambertian albedo spectrum is valuable geologically because it allows the mineralogical composition to be estimated. Here, I/F is defined as the ratio of the radiance measured by CRISM to the solar irradiance at Mars divided by π; if there was no martian atmosphere, I/F divided by the cosine of the incidence angle would be equal to the Lambert albedo for a Lambertian surface. After discussing the capabilities and limitations of the pipeline software system, we demonstrate its application on several multispectral data cubes-particularly, the outer reaches of the northern ice cap of Mars, the Tyrrhena Terra area that is northeast of the Hellas basin, and an area near the landing site for the Phoenix mission in the northern plains. For the icy spectra near the northern polar cap, aerosols need to be included in order to properly correct for the CO 2 absorption in the H 2 O ice bands at wavelengths near 2.0 μm. In future phases of software development, we intend to use CRISM data directly in order to retrieve the spatiotemporal maps of aerosol optical depths, surface pressure, and surface temperature. This will allow a second level of refinement in the atmospheric and thermal correction of CRISM multispectral data. Index Terms-Atmospheric propagation, infrared spectroscopy, remote sensing, software verification and validation. Kim A. Lichtenberg received the B.S. degree in engineering science from the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, and the A.M. degree in earth and planetary sciences from Washington University, St. Louis, MO, where she is currently working toward the Ph.D. degree at the McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences and is working on mineralogy and stratigraphy of the martian crust. Sandra M. Wiseman received the B.S. degree in geology from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and the A.M. degree in earth and planetary sciences from Washington University, St. Louis, MO, where she is currently working toward the Ph.D. degree at the McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences. Robert O. Green received the B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees from Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, and the Ph.D. degree from the University of California, Santa Barbara, investigating the spectroscopy of the three phases of water. As a Senior Research Scientist with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, he is the Experiment Scientist for the NASA AVIRIS airborne imaging spectrometer as well as a co-investigator on the CRISM imaging spectrometer for Mars and the M3 imaging spectrometer for the Moon. His research area includes environmental imaging spectroscopy with a focus on water and also measurement calibration and validation. Terry Z. Martin received the A.B. degree from the University of California, Berkeley, and the Ph.D. degree from the University of Hawaii, Honolulu. He is currently a Planetary Scientist with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, specializing in martian surface and atmospheric behavior. Ralph E. Milliken received the B.S. degree from Indiana University, Bloomington, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in geology from Brown University, Providence, RI. He is currently a researcher with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena. His research interests include remote sensing, mineralogy, and sedimentology/stratigraphy.
doi:10.1109/tgrs.2008.2000631 fatcat:xo7cnoej5jcd7bpigzywmlkjo4