"The Lord Is My Portion"

F. E. Gladstone
1873 The Musical Times and Singing Class Circular  
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more » ... r one or the other for its intended purpose, and it svill inevitablr result in a failure. " Little May's Musical Drawing Slate" is good of its kind. The lessons are well set, the exercises on the names of the notes, &c, are carefully arranged, and the printing is clear. We do not doubt that the system is faithfully carried out; we only doubt the soundness of the system itself. R. LIMPUS. " The LozJd is 11go portiow." Anthem by F. E. Gladstone. THE most interestinv part of this piece is the first strain, which is given first by solo voices and repeated by the chorus. What follows, by far the larger part of the anthem, is correctly written, but has little attraction. A practice pSrevails throughout, in which the writer is by no means singular, but which still is open to question of its propriety. This is, the setting of a longer note to the second and unaccented syllable than to the first, in such words as "portiosl," "blos.som," "olive," and the like, enforcinffl by syncopation the unnatural accent thus induced. Too many inferior singers pursue this practice with serious detriment to our greatly abused English language and to the vocal effect; but if it be incorrect, its use by singers justifies not its adoption by composers, who should rather give than take the rule in such matters. The only thing that can be defensively urged is that, in speech, we do not dwell on the first syllable of such words as are above quoted from the anthem, wherein the strongly accented first syllable has a short vowel. Admitting the truth of this, it must still be protested that we do not dwell either upon the second syllable when we speak, and that to do so when we sing distorts the word, gives often a stronger prominence to a short vowel in the one syllable than that svhich is avoided in the other, and gives a colour of truth to the else groundless assertion that ours is an unmusical language. It is less against good sound and pure sense in such cases, to elongate the first than the second syliable in words of this formation, and it is practicable also in many cases to have a rest after the second syllable; either of these, or anything else, would be better than what we cannot but esteem as a sulgarism which it is the duty of the musical declaimer to correct. It is not here intended to place on the shoulders of the author of this Anthem all the burden of other folks' short-comings, executive and productive; the instances adduced from his work suggest the consideration now given to the subject; but many worse present themselves to the ears and eves of all who listen to singing or read vocal music. The Anthem gained the five guinea prize of the College of Organists in I870, and so comes before the world with strong credentials. Asze1astte, in A major, for the Organ, by F. E. Gladstone. THIS is another of the prize pieces of the College of Organists, and the late organist of Chichester Cathedral is again the winner. Unluckily-for such things are always matters of luck and not of malice-it begins like a Russian melody svhich has been familiarised in this country by its employment in one of the earliest pieces of Thalberg for the pianoforte, and also by its inclusion in a violin fantasia of the late Ferdinand David that Herr Joachim used to play when he visited us as a boy and excited the wondering delight of all who heard him. There is abundant other matter in the present Andante, all of interest, and well disposed for the organ, which proves the graceful and cultivated mind of the author. Practice in writing, and the careful observation of the forms in svhich the masters of the art cast their thoughts, svill improve the composer's command of the principles of plan, wherein this piece shows him to be defective. WILLIAM MORLEEF. Lcl HQa Estchawltec. Morceau de Salon, compose.d for the Pianoforte by F. V. Kornatzki. HARP music for the Pianoforte, like Pianoforte music for the Harp, can scarcely perhaps be pronounced legitimate? but the public has to a certain extent accepted it; and where there is a demand, there is pretty certain to be a supply. This " Morceau " is so exceedingly like the tempt to use either one or the other for its intended purpose, and it svill inevitablr result in a failure. " Little May's Musical Drawing Slate" is good of its kind. The lessons are well set, the exercises on the names of the notes, &c, are carefully arranged, and the printing is clear. We do not doubt that the system is faithfully carried out; we only doubt the soundness of the system itself.
doi:10.2307/3354457 fatcat:byaj2jqn4nbbzevp4huiqpl5mu