Peer Review #1 of "Uncovering unseen fungal diversity from plant DNA banks (v0.1)" [peer_review]

2017 unpublished
Throughout the world DNA banks are used as storage repositories for genetic diversity of organisms ranging from plants to insects to mammals. Designed to preserve the genetic information for organisms of interest, these banks also indirectly preserve organisms' associated microbiomes, including fungi associated with plant tissues. Studies of fungal biodiversity lag far behind those of macroorganisms, such as plants, and estimates of global fungal richness are still widely debated. Utilizing
more » ... ated. Utilizing previously collected specimens to study patterns of fungal diversity could significantly increase our understanding of overall patterns of biodiversity from snapshots in time. Here, we investigated the fungi inhabiting the phylloplane among species of the endemic Hawaiian plant genus, Clermontia (Campanulaceae). Utilizing next generation DNA amplicon sequencing, we uncovered approximately 1,780 fungal operational taxonomic units, from just 20 DNA bank samples collected throughout the main Hawaiian Islands. Using these historical samples, we tested the macroecological pattern of decreasing community similarity with decreasing geographic proximity. We found a significant distance decay pattern among Clermontia associated fungal communities. This study provides the first insights into elucidating patterns of microbial diversity through the use of DNA bank repository samples. PeerJ reviewing PDF | Abstract 25 Throughout the world DNA banks are used as storage repositories for genetic diversity of 26 organisms ranging from plants to insects to mammals. Designed to preserve the genetic 27 information for organisms of interest, these banks also indirectly preserve organisms' associated 28 microbiomes, including fungi associated with plant tissues. Studies of fungal biodiversity lag far 29 behind those of macroorganisms, such as plants, and estimates of global fungal richness are still 30 widely debated. Utilizing previously collected specimens to study patterns of fungal diversity 31 could significantly increase our understanding of overall patterns of biodiversity from snapshots 32 in time. Here, we investigated the fungi inhabiting the phylloplane among species of the endemic 33 Hawaiian plant genus, Clermontia (Campanulaceae). Utilizing next generation DNA amplicon 34 sequencing, we uncovered approximately 1,780 fungal operational taxonomic units, from just 20 35 DNA bank samples collected throughout the main Hawaiian Islands. Using these historical 36 samples, we tested the macroecological pattern of decreasing community similarity with 37 decreasing geographic proximity. We found a significant distance decay pattern among 38 Clermontia associated fungal communities. This study provides the first insights into elucidating 39 patterns of microbial diversity through the use of DNA bank repository samples.
doi:10.7287/peerj.3730v0.1/reviews/1 fatcat:mhgj5xsm4nczpknuoihon7k44u