Science and Societal Benefits of OST Measurements: Communications & Collaboration MEASURING RESERVOIR HEIGHTS WITH ALTIMETRY A NASA DEVELOP Project ALONG-TRACK NRT SSHA DATA Images Available Online NASA DEMONSTRATES TSUNAMI PREDICTION SYSTEM

Margaret Srinivasan, Robert Leben, Y Song, William Patzert, Athelstan Spilhaus, Chelton Dudley, Stommel Henry, Josh Research, Willis
Ocean Surface Topography Science Team Meeting   unpublished
ighteen years of ocean surface topography (OST) measurements brings us the formal migration to an operational mode from the technological advances the OST missions have delivered. After the third anniversary of the launch of OSTM/Jason-2, we now look forward to the launches of the operational Jason-series satellites. Jason-3 is projected to launch in 2014 with NOAA and Eumetsat leading the efforts, along with partners NASA and CNES. Plans for Jason-4, Jason-CS, and SWOT are underway. It is
more » ... asingly relevant to focus attention and to promote the science and societal benefits of the OST missions. This has been primarily achieved through web interfaces, media stories based on research results, OSTST member activities, and mission milestones. We advance awareness and visibility of OST mission science by focusing on the direct benefits of these measurements to society. As we focus our attention on current datasets and future missions, we urge OSTST members to partner with the Outreach and Applications efforts in promoting science results and providing learning opportunities in educational forums. The ocean altimetry web sites are one of our most accessible resources for providing target audiences-students, the general public, current or potential operational/ commercial data users, and science colleagues-with updates, information, educational resources, and access to data portals. Altimetry data is used to adjust global flood models in order to account for the affects of dams on a watershed regions. This method can be used to predict future floods, preventing economic loss and ultimately saving lives. DEVELOP is a NASA Applied Sciences training and development program. Students work on Earth science research projects, mentored by science advisors from NASA and partner agencies and extend research results to local communities.. For more information see Daily samples of the along-track near-real-time (NRT) sea surface height anomaly (SSHA) measurements from the Jason-1 and Jason-2 satellite altimeter missions are available on the OST web site. Measurements are typically available within 5 to 7 hours of real time and can be used for meteorological applications (i.e. weather), marine operations (i.e. fishing, boating, offshore operations), and other applications where knowledge of current ocean conditions are relevant.
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