Relationship between job burnout and somatic diseases: a network analysis

Roland Von Känel, Mary Princip, Sarah A Holzgang, Walther J Fuchs, Marc Van Nuffel, Aju P Pazhenkottil, Tobias R Spiller
2020
Job burnout, characterized by feelings of exhaustion, cynicism and reduced personal efficacy, has been defined as a risk state for the development of diseases, but its association with somatic diseases is underexplored. Study participants were 5671 respondents (mean age 44.1 years, range 18-70; 38.6% men) to an online survey of job burnout, using a mobile health web application. Respondents provided data on sociodemographic characteristics, symptoms of burnout, measured with the Maslach Burnout
more » ... Inventory-General Survey, depressive symptoms, measured with the Profile of Mood States, and 11 categories of somatic diseases. Adjusting for age, sex, educational level, depressive symptoms, and all disease categories included, network analysis showed a significant association of high exhaustion with "high blood pressure" and a category of "other chronic somatic diseases". Low personal efficacy showed a significant association with "chronic lung diseases". In network analysis, clinically relevant depressive symptoms were also significantly associated with "high blood pressure", "other chronic somatic diseases" and "skin diseases". Logistic regression analysis confirmed these associations. Burnout dimensions were significantly associated with an increased risk for somatic diseases, independently of sociodemographic factors and clinically relevant depressive symptoms. This relationship seems particularly evident for the exhaustion dimension of job burnout. Job burnout, characterized by feelings of exhaustion, cynicism and reduced personal efficacy, has been defined as a risk state for the development of diseases, but its association with somatic diseases is underexplored. Study participants were 5671 respondents (mean age 44.1 years, range 18-70; 38.6% men) to an online survey of job burnout, using a mobile health web application. Respondents provided data on sociodemographic characteristics, symptoms of burnout, measured with the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey, depressive symptoms, measured with the Profile of Mood States, and 11 categories of somatic diseases. Adjusting for age, sex, educational level, depressive symptoms, and all disease categories included, network analysis showed a significant association of high exhaustion with "high blood pressure" and a category of "other chronic somatic diseases". Low personal efficacy showed a significant association with "chronic lung diseases". In network analysis, clinically relevant depressive symptoms were also significantly associated with "high blood pressure", "other chronic somatic diseases" and "skin diseases". Logistic regression analysis confirmed these associations. Burnout dimensions were significantly associated with an increased risk for somatic diseases, independently of sociodemographic factors and clinically relevant depressive symptoms. This relationship seems particularly evident for the exhaustion dimension of job burnout. OPEN
doi:10.5167/uzh-196108 fatcat:yrzfyerd6jee3h62cjx2joypva