Science AMA Series: Scientists are on board the R/V JOIDES Resolution for two months to drill into the ocean floor to investigate geochemical, tectonic, and biological processes occurring in undersea mud volcanoes in an active subduction zone [dataset]

IODP, r/Science
The Winnower   unpublished
Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with us today! Given we know so little about sea life at that depth it may be likely you see an undescribed organism. Are you expecting this? It's an exciting prospect. If so, what are the steps to describing and naming a new species? Which animal group is the most likely to be found/most abundant at those depths? New or otherwise. How long does it take to reach your destination? REDDIT Science AMA Series: Scientists are on board the R/V JOIDES
more » ... lution for two months to drill into the ocean floor to investigate geochemical, tectonic, and biological processes occurring in undersea mud volcanoes in an active subduction zone. IODP R/SCIENCE The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) conducts scientific ocean drilling expeditions throughout the world's oceans in search of clues to Earth's structure and past. The current expedition is Expedition 366: Marina Convergent Margin, aboard the U.S. vessel for scientific ocean drilling, the JOIDES Resolution. The scientists embarking on this expedition hope to learn (1) how sediments, fluids and chemicals move and cycle through the earth's crust; (2) the role of tectonics and mud volcanoes in transporting fluids and sediments in subduction zones; and (3) how these physical and chemical movements impact living organisms. The research team will use deep sea drilling technology to drill into undersea mud volcanoes near the Mariana Trench, taking core samples of sediments and fluids that they can study on board the ship. By analyzing the chemicals, sediment layers, and microorganisms within the core sample, scientists can answer questions about how rocks, fluids, and chemicals cycle through the earth's crust, and this affects life on the seafloor and beyond. Studying sediment layers, geochemical cycles, and fluid dynamics in the earth's crust can tell us a lot about how geological formations (like volcanoes, canyons, and mountains) are formed, and how they change over long periods of time. By extracting cores in subduction zones, scientists can answer questions about how the earth's crust moves and changes through plate tectonics, and how this impacts life in the ocean and on land. Collecting biological samples of living (and past) organisms in these seismically active regions allows us to study how life on earth may have begun, and how organisms have evolved to survive in extreme environments. A team of 30 scientists from around the globe are on board for two months to work on these questions. Hand-in-hand with the amazing technology required to drill deep into the ocean floor, we are collecting the core samples that hold clues to answer these questions. Thank you to everyone today for your great questions! Our Live session is officially over, but we will check back in th following days in case there are any follow-up questions for us to answer. Thanks everyone, science rocks! ✎
doi:10.15200/winn.148543.38658 fatcat:pwzotondzzdt7bro25ualj7ap4