Peer Review #3 of "Ambient temperature and cardiovascular mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis (v0.1)" [peer_review]

W Goggins
2017 unpublished
Our study aims at identifying and quantifying the relationship between the cold and heat exposure and the risk of cardiovascular mortality through a systematic review and meta-analysis Material and Methods: A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guideline. Peer-reviewed studies about the temperature and cardiovascular mortality were retrieved in the MEDLINE, Web of Science; and Scopus
more » ... and Scopus databases from January 2000 up to the end of 2015. The pooled effect sizes of short-term effect were calculated for the heat exposure and cold exposure separately. Also, we assessed the dose-response relationship of temperature-cardiovascular mortality by a change in units of latitudes, longitude, lag days and annual mean temperature by Metaregression. Result: After screening the titles, abstracts and full texts; 26 articles were included in the meta-analysis. The risk of cardiovascular mortality increased by 5% (RR, 1.055; 95% CI, 1.050 to 1.060) for the cold exposure, 1.3% (RR, 1.013; 95% CI, 1.011 to 1.015) for the heat exposure. The short-term effects of cold and heat exposure on risk of cardiovascular mortality in males were 3.8% (RR, 1.038; 95% CI, 1.034 to 1.043) and 1.1 %( RR, 1.011; 95% CI, 1.009 to 1.013) respectively. Moreover, effects of cold and heat exposure on risk of cardiovascular mortality in females were 4.1% (RR, 1.041; 95% CI, 1.037 to 1.045) and 1.4% (RR, 1.014; 95% CI, 1.011 to 1.017) respectively. In the elderly, it was at 8.1% increase and 6% increase in the heat and cold exposure respectively. The greatest risk of cardiovascular mortality in cold temperature was in the 14 lag days (RR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.010) and in hot temperature in the 7 lag days (RR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.09 to .(1.17 The significant dose-response relationship of latitude and longitude in cold exposure with cardiovascular mortality was found. The results showed that the risk of PeerJ reviewing PDF | Manuscript to be reviewed cardiovascular mortality increased with each degree increased significantly in latitude and longitude in cold exposure (0.2%, 95% CI: (0.006-0.035) and (0.07%, 95% CI: 0.0003 -0.014) respectively. The risk of cardiovascular mortality increased with each degree increase in latitude in heat exposure (0.07%, 95% CI: 0.0008 -0.124). Conclusion: Our findings indicate that the increase and decrease in ambient temperature had a relationship with the cardiovascular mortality. To prevent the temperature-related mortality, persons with cardiovascular disease and the elderly should be targeted. The review has been registered with PROSPERO (registration number CRD42016037673). PeerJ reviewing PDF | Abstract: Introduction: Our study aims at identifying and quantifying the relationship between the cold and heat exposure and the risk of cardiovascular mortality through a systematic review and meta-analysis Material and Methods: A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guideline. Peer-reviewed studies about the temperature and cardiovascular mortality were retrieved in the MEDLINE, Web of Science; and Scopus databases from January 2000 up to the end of 2015. The pooled effect sizes of short-term PeerJ reviewing PDF | Manuscript to be reviewed effect were calculated for the heat exposure and cold exposure separately. Also, we assessed the dose-response relationship of temperature-cardiovascular mortality by a change in units of latitudes, longitude, lag days and annual mean temperature by Meta-regression. Result: After screening the titles, abstracts and full texts; 26 articles were included in the meta-analysis. The risk of cardiovascular mortality increased by 5% (RR, 1.055; 95% CI, 1.050 to 1.060) for the cold exposure, 1.3% (RR, 1.013; 95% CI, 1.011 to 1.015) for the heat exposure. The short-term effects of cold and heat exposure on risk of cardiovascular mortality in males were 3.8% (RR, 1.038; 95% CI, 1.034 to 1.043) and 1.1 %( RR, 1.011; 95% CI, 1.009 to 1.013) respectively. Moreover, effects of cold and heat exposure on risk of cardiovascular mortality in females were 4.1% (RR, 1.041; 95% CI, 1.037 to 1.045) and 1.4% (RR, 1.014; 95% CI, 1.011 to 1.017) respectively. In the elderly, it was at 8.1% increase and 6% increase in the heat and cold exposure respectively. The greatest risk of cardiovascular mortality in cold temperature was in the 14 lag days (RR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.010) and in hot temperature in the 7 lag days (RR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.17). The significant dose-response relationship of latitude and longitude in cold exposure with cardiovascular mortality was found. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that the increase and decrease in ambient temperature had a relationship with the cardiovascular mortality. To prevent the temperature-related mortality, persons with cardiovascular disease and the elderly should be targeted. The review has been registered with PROSPERO (registration number CRD42016037673). PeerJ reviewing PDF |
doi:10.7287/peerj.3574v0.1/reviews/3 fatcat:d6xsjmildbdbxdjrl55eamqt5m