Interfacing virtual and face-to-face teaching methods in an undergraduate human physiology course for health professions students

Angela L. Mahaffey
2018 Advances in Physiology Education  
Mahaffey AL. Interfacing virtual and face-to-face teaching methods in an undergraduate human physiology course for health professions students. Human physiology is a core physical sciences course for health professions students, such as nurses and exercise science majors. The concepts of human physiology lay the foundation for health professions courses, such as pathophysiology. The National Council Licensing Exam for registered nurses (a timed nursing licensure exam) and the American College
more » ... Sports Medicine timed licensure exams for exercise sciences students have a framework consisting of human physiology concepts and are computer adaptive testing (CAT) assessments. This provides a case for electronic testing (in the undergraduate class setting) as a preparatory measure for CAT licensing exams. Case studies have illustrated a high information retention rate, with students completing online homework vs. paper, as well. Additionally, in recent years, virtual laboratories for nonphysical science majors have been described as safer and effective for the purposes of educating students in laboratory techniques and experimental measures. Lastly, a successful learning approach utilized by museums has been found to be effective in younger students as well: "touch learning" (tactile learning). It also is important to note that student discussions and the face-to-face teaching dynamic play a critical role in the undergraduate education process. As such, the teaching methodology discussed here combines e-learning, virtual laboratories, tactile learning, and face-to-face didactic instruction of human physiology in developing a course to engage undergraduate health professions students, increase retention of human physiology course materials, and simultaneously prepare students for the CAT assessments that are licensing exams. course development; health professions; undergraduate
doi:10.1152/advan.00097.2018 pmid:30035633 fatcat:zkmgntnsefaavphqqqmwbsovsy