Room-temperature bonding of epitaxial layer to carbon-cluster ion-implanted silicon wafers for CMOS image sensors

Yoshihiro Koga, Takeshi Kadono, Satoshi Shigematsu, Ryo Hirose, Ayumi Onaka-Masada, Ryousuke Okuyama, Hidehiko Okuda, Kazunari Kurita
2018 Japanese Journal of Applied Physics  
Proximity gettering of C 3 H 5 carbon cluster ion-implanted silicon wafers for CMOS image sensors: Gettering effects of transition metal, oxygen, and hydrogen impurities Kazunari Kurita, Takeshi Kadono, Ryousuke Okuyama et al. -Effect of dose and size on defect engineering in carbon cluster implanted silicon wafers Ryosuke Okuyama, Ayumi Masada, Satoshi Shigematsu et al. -Proximity gettering of silicon wafers using CH 3 O multielement molecular ion implantation technique Ryo Hirose, Takeshi
more » ... no, Ryosuke Okuyama et al. -This content was downloaded from IP address 207.241.231. We propose a fabrication process for silicon wafers by combining carbon-cluster ion implantation and room-temperature bonding for advanced CMOS image sensors. These carbon-cluster ions are made of carbon and hydrogen, which can passivate process-induced defects. We demonstrated that this combination process can be used to form an epitaxial layer on a carbon-cluster ion-implanted Czochralski (CZ)-grown silicon substrate with a high dose of 1 ' 10 16 atoms/cm 2 . This implantation condition transforms the top-surface region of the CZ-grown silicon substrate into a thin amorphous layer. Thus, an epitaxial layer cannot be grown on this implanted CZ-grown silicon substrate. However, this combination process can be used to form an epitaxial layer on the amorphous layer of this implanted CZ-grown silicon substrate surface. This bonding wafer has strong gettering capability in both the wafer-bonding region and the carbon-cluster ion-implanted projection range. Furthermore, this wafer inhibits oxygen out-diffusion to the epitaxial layer from the CZ-grown silicon substrate after device fabrication. Therefore, we believe that this bonding wafer is effective in decreasing the dark current and white-spot defect density for advanced CMOS image sensors. Fig. 2. Fabrication flow of silicon wafer by combining carbon-cluster ion implantation and room-temperature bonding.
doi:10.7567/jjap.57.061302 fatcat:y6z5gv45s5e47bfqcfh755vfra