Alterations in Fc receptor function of macrophages from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

C K Abrass, M Hori
1984 Journal of Immunology  
The presence of elevated levels of circulating immune complexes in diabetic humans and animals suggests impaired phagocyte function. To evaluate FcR-mediated phagocytosis, resident peritoneal macrophages were harvested from control, streptozotocin-induced diabetic, and insulin-treated diabetic rats. FcR number and avidity were determined from Scatchard analysis of binding of 125I-labeled aggregated rat IgG (ARG) to macrophages. The total and fractional catabolic capacity were determined by
more » ... itating the digestion of ARG as a percent of the total ARG added and as a percent of ARG bound. Insulin-deficient diabetic rats had an increase in the number of FcR per cell (26.8 +/- 3.5 X 10(4)) as compared with control animals (13.1 +/- 1.2 X 10(4)) (p less than 0.01). In contrast, insulin-treated diabetic animals had a reduction in the number of FcR per cell (9.8 +/- 1.4 X 10(4)) (p less than 0.01). FcR of macrophages from insulin-deficient diabetic rats had a lower avidity (Kd = 6.9 +/- 1.8 X 10(-10)M) when compared with control (3.7 +/- 0.6 X 10(-10)M) and insulin-treated diabetic rats (3.6 +/- 0.9 X 10(-10)M) (p less than 0.01). Total catabolism of ARG by macrophages from both insulin-deficient and insulin-treated diabetic rats was reduced (31.0% +/- 3.4 and 17.5% +/- 3, respectively) when compared with controls (49.6% +/- 5.2) (p less than 0.01). Fractional catabolism by macrophages from insulin-deficient diabetic rats was significantly reduced (21% +/- 1.9 and 4.6% +/- 0.9/10(4) FcR) when compared with results from control rats (26% +/- 1.3 and 6.7% +/- 0.7/10(4) FcR) (p less than 0.01), whereas the results from insulin-treated diabetic rats (32% +/- 2.4 and 10.8% +/- 1.0/10(4) FcR) (p less than 0.01) were greater than those from controls. These studies demonstrate that FcR-mediated phagocytosis of soluble, "model" immune complexes is impaired in macrophages from both insulin-deficient and insulin-treated diabetic rats; however, different mechanisms account for this impairment in phagocytosis. Despite an increase in FcR number of macrophages from insulin-deficient diabetic rats, the depression of post-receptor-mediated catabolism results in a net depression in phagocytic activity. In contrast, macrophages from insulin-treated diabetic rats display augmented post-receptor-mediated catabolism; however, this does not overcome the low initial binding of ARG to the cell that results from the depression of FcR number.
doi:10.4049/jimmunol.133.3.1307 fatcat:tlilmikvsngjpo4r5p6xu4voye