Number 4 Article 13 Clinical Supervision in Allied Health in Australia: A Model of Allied Health Clinical Supervision Based On Practitioner Experience. The Internet Journal of Allied Health Sciences and Practice

Sue Fitzpatrick, Megan Smith, Clare Wilding, S Fitzpatrick, Smith, Wilding, Sue Fitzpatrick, Megan Smith, Clare Wilding
2015 unpublished
Purpose: The purpose of this manuscript is to identify key elements of allied health clinical supervision based on allied health practitioner's experiences. Method: This study was conducted with qualitative methodology, including content analysis, and draws on hermeneutic interpretation of texts. Data were collected through an online survey in an Australian health service and subsequent focus groups. Results: Findings revealed four key dimensions including accessibility of regular clinical
more » ... gular clinical supervision, relationships between the supervisor and supervisee, clarity about the purpose, and roles and a focus on meeting the supervisee's needs; these dimensions were central to the allied health practitioner's experience of successful clinical supervision. A model of clinical supervision is proposed that is based on these four identified key dimensions. This model could be used as a broad schema to achieve a successful clinical supervision experience in allied health. Conclusion: This study contributes to the growing body of clinical supervision research by specifically addressing allied health needs in clinical supervision and proposing a model for its implementation. The authors contribute to the discussion about clinical supervision and its implementation by addressing needs that relate specifically to allied health and by developing a deeper understanding of the clinical supervision experiences of allied health clinicians. This new understanding provides a foundation for clinician-focused supervision, policy development and implementation. ABSTRACT Purpose: The purpose of this manuscript is to identify key elements of allied health clinical supervision based on allied health practitioner's experiences. Method: This study was conducted with qualitative methodology, including content analysis, and draws on hermeneutic interpretation of texts. Data were collected through an online survey in an Australian health service and subsequent focus groups. Results: Findings revealed four key dimensions including accessibility of regular clinical supervision, relationships between the supervisor and supervisee, clarity about the purpose, and roles and a focus on meeting the supervisee's needs; these dimensions were central to the allied health practitioner's experience of successful clinical supervision. A model of clinical supervision is proposed that is based on these four identified key dimensions. This model could be used as a broad schema to achieve a successful clinical supervision experience in allied health. Conclusion: This study contributes to the growing body of clinical supervision research by specifically addressing allied health needs in clinical supervision and proposing a model for its implementation. The authors contribute to the discussion about clinical supervision and its implementation by addressing needs that relate specifically to allied health and by developing a deeper understanding of the clinical supervision experiences of allied health clinicians. This new understanding provides a foundation for clinician-focused supervision, policy development and implementation. Previous studies of clinical supervision have identified four key dimensions: the presence of a successful supervisory relationship, accessible clinical supervision, clarity of expectations in clinical supervision, and supervision that focuses on meeting the needs of the supervisee, as important issues in clinical supervision in allied health, nursing and medicine (Table 1) . These four dimensions have been described either together or in isolation; however, no integrated model of clinical supervision has emerged. The result is an incomplete understanding of the needs of staff supervising, or being supervised, in allied health that would adequately inform policy development. In a previous publication, the authors have published a review of the literature that summarized the existing supervision literature as lacking a clear understanding of what clinical supervision means to allied health and how it should be implemented. 1
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