Weekly Summary of the Progress of Science [stub]

1883 Science  
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more » ... out Early Journal Content at http://about.jstor.org/participate--jstor/individuals/early-journal--content. JSTOR is a digital library of academic journals, books, and primary source objects. JSTOR helps people discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content through a powerful research and teaching platform, and preserves this content for future generations. JSTOR is part of ITHAKA, a not--for--profit organization that also includes Ithaka S+R and Portico. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org. 488 SCIENCE. SCIENCE. unhappily, died shortly after the end of the journey from the effects of exposure. There is a provoking lack of appreciation of geographical form, and a want of understanding of geological structure, that deprives the observations of much value; and the pen-drawings that illustrate the book in good number are extremely rough. Perseverance and energy are, however, apparent enough in the success of the expedition; and the itinerary notes as to roads, supplies, and water, have a great value for those who may have to repeat the author's journey in this desert country. The party entered from the southern coast at Gwadar; and, after traversing for some two hundred miles a barren region of flat valleys or plains abruptly broken by mountain ranges, they reached the desert interior basin, into whose depressions the Mashkel flows from the south; the Halmand and others, from the north-east and north; and several smaller temporary streams, from the surrounding or dividing ranges, forming salt plains or marshes (hamun) at the lowest points. This district is absolutely barren, and very flat, broken only by sand-ridges, or occasional rocky peaks that rise like islands over the level plain. The largest central depression, known as the God-i-zirreh, is a dry salt waste about seventy miles long east and west, and twenty miles wide, surrounded by a barren sandy desert; and the passage across the southern margin of this desolate tract, hitherto unexplored, to a point named Shah Godar, exposed the explorers to great hardships. Water was found there only by digging in the sand of a dry streamchannel (175-185). This was their farthest station; and from it they returned eastward to Jacobabad, in Sind. The people were found avaricious and untrustworthy: their towns unhappily, died shortly after the end of the journey from the effects of exposure. There is a provoking lack of appreciation of geographical form, and a want of understanding of geological structure, that deprives the observations of much value; and the pen-drawings that illustrate the book in good number are extremely rough. Perseverance and energy are, however, apparent enough in the success of the expedition; and the itinerary notes as to roads, supplies, and water, have a great value for those who may have to repeat the author's journey in this desert country. The party entered from the southern coast at Gwadar; and, after traversing for some two hundred miles a barren region of flat valleys or plains abruptly broken by mountain ranges, they reached the desert interior basin, into whose depressions the Mashkel flows from the south; the Halmand and others, from the north-east and north; and several smaller temporary streams, from the surrounding or dividing ranges, forming salt plains or marshes (hamun) at the lowest points. This district is absolutely barren, and very flat, broken only by sand-ridges, or occasional rocky peaks that rise like islands over the level plain. The largest central depression, known as the God-i-zirreh, is a dry salt waste about seventy miles long east and west, and twenty miles wide, surrounded by a barren sandy desert; and the passage across the southern margin of this desolate tract, hitherto unexplored, to a point named Shah Godar, exposed the explorers to great hardships. Water was found there only by digging in the sand of a dry streamchannel (175-185). This was their farthest station; and from it they returned eastward to Jacobabad, in Sind. The people were found avaricious and untrustworthy: their towns [VOL. I., No. 17. [VOL. I., No. 17.
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