Lifecycle design and management of additive manufacturing technologies

Jakob R. Müller, Massimo Panarotto, Johan Malmqvist, Ola Isaksson
2018 Procedia Manufacturing  
Downloaded from: https://research.chalmers.se, 2021-07-15 05:14 UTC Citation for the original published paper (version of record): Müller, J., Panarotto, M., Malmqvist, J. et al (2018) Lifecycle design and management of additive manufacturing technologies Procedia Manufacturing, 19: 135-142 http://dx. Abstract Under the concept of "Industry 4.0", production processes will be pushed to be increasingly interconnected, information based on a real time basis and, necessarily, much more efficient.
more » ... this context, capacity optimization goes beyond the traditional aim of capacity maximization, contributing also for organization's profitability and value. Indeed, lean management and continuous improvement approaches suggest capacity optimization instead of maximization. The study of capacity optimization and costing models is an important research topic that deserves contributions from both the practical and theoretical perspectives. This paper presents and discusses a mathematical model for capacity management based on different costing models (ABC and TDABC). A generic model has been developed and it was used to analyze idle capacity and to design strategies towards the maximization of organization's value. The trade-off capacity maximization vs operational efficiency is highlighted and it is shown that capacity optimization might hide operational inefficiency. Abstract Additive manufacturing (AM) is being proposed as a revolutionary manufacturing technology, promising significant advantages both from a design and production perspective. One challenge is the disruptive nature of AM and its impact on all life cycle phases. This paper reports from a demonstrator project highlighting digitalization and process implications. A demonstrator tool was developed able to collectively capture and visualize different life cycle implications of AM products. Market expectations, technology characteristics and life cycle constraints were met in the demonstrator tool. Each individual part collected its own traceable data set, from design over manufacturing up to postproduction services. Key aspects demonstrated were 1) the need to represent any manufacturing and life cycle constraint already in design, 2) the need to integrate unique identifiers that build a digital twin and 3) the need to automate links between life cycle engineering steps. Abstract Additive manufacturing (AM) is being proposed as a revolutionary manufacturing technology, promising significant advantages both from a design and production perspective. One challenge is the disruptive nature of AM and its impact on all life cycle phases. This paper reports from a demonstrator project highlighting digitalization and process implications. A demonstrator tool was developed able to collectively capture and visualize different life cycle implications of AM products. Market expectations, technology characteristics and life cycle constraints were met in the demonstrator tool. Each individual part collected its own traceable data set, from design over manufacturing up to postproduction services. Key aspects demonstrated were 1) the need to represent any manufacturing and life cycle constraint already in design, 2) the need to integrate unique identifiers that build a digital twin and 3) the need to automate links between life cycle engineering steps.
doi:10.1016/j.promfg.2018.01.019 fatcat:2jdznyepdnf2xozrrsik2bwtse