Knowledge and preventive practices towards Covid-19 and associated factors among healthcare workers in selected health facilities of Illu Aba Bor and Buno Bedelle Zones, Southwest Ethiopia [post]

Dereje Tsegaye, Muluneh Shuremu, Dereje Oljira, Sileshi Dubale, Getachew Befekadu, Kebebew Bidira
2020 unpublished
Background The COVID-19 outbreak has been declared a public health emergency of international concern. As the virus is transmitted through close contact and droplets, frontline HCWs caring for COVID-19 patients are at risk of the infection. This study aimed at assessing knowledge and preventive practices towards Covid-19 among health care providers in selected health facilities of Illu Aba Bor and Buno Bedele zones, Southwest Ethiopia. Methods An institution-based cross-sectional study was
more » ... cted from April to May 2020 among 330 health workers in selected health facilities of Illu Aba Bor and Buno-Bedelle Zones, Southwest Ethiopia. Data were collected using a self-administered structured questionnaire. The collected data were entered onto Epidata version 3.1 and exported to SPSS version 23 for analysis. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent predictors of preventive practices towards Covid-19. Statistical significance was declared at a p-value of < 0.05. Result Greater part (93.3%) of the respondent demonstrated good knowledge towards COVID-19 and the mean (± SD) knowledge score was 9.0 4 ± 1.06. Nearly two-thirds (64.2%) of the study participants had good infection prevention practices. Being male (AOR = 3.65, 95% CI: (1.96, 6.80)), education level (AOR = 1.82, 95% CI (1.02, 3.22)), profession (AOR = 3.17, 95% CI (1.08, 9.33)), service year ( 5–10 years) (AOR = 2.00 (1.02, 3.92)) and more than 10 years (AOR = 3.14 (1.51, 6.52)), availability of personal protective equipment (AOR = 1.96 (1.06, 3.61)) and Knowledge level (AOR = 2.61 (1.48, 4.62)) were independent predictors of COVID-19 preventive practices. Conclusion The overall level of knowledge of HCWs was good. However, the practice was relatively low. Gender, educational status, profession, year of service, knowledge towards COVID-19, and availability of personal protective equipment were independent predictors of good infection prevention practices. Optimizing the infection prevention and control loop of the health facilities is recommended.
doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-49537/v1 fatcat:yoa6mpuadneipdisbbfjhvjqy4