Among the Publishers [stub]

1891 Science  
Known as the Early Journal Content, this set of works include research articles, news, letters, and other writings published in more than 200 of the oldest leading academic journals. The works date from the mid--seventeenth to the early twentieth centuries. We encourage people to read and share the Early Journal Content openly and to tell others that this resource exists. People may post this content online or redistribute in any way for non--commercial purposes. Read more about Early Journal
more » ... ntent at http://about.jstor.org/participate--jstor/individuals/early-journal--content. JSTOR is a digital library of academic journals, books, and primary source objects. JSTOR helps people discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content through a powerful research and teaching platform, and preserves this content for future generations. JSTOR is part of ITHAKA, a not--for--profit organization that also includes Ithaka S+R and Portico. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org. 262 Professor Hugo Schuchardt is the most distinguished student living of mixed language.s or " jargons," and his researches into their structure have been prolific of valuable results. The above is but one-the ninth-of his numerous ' Creole Studies." It is one of the most instructive, as exhibiting the results of the commingling of the Portuguese with the ZIalagan languages, which are particularlv widely apart. Like all his essays, it is replete with erudition, and marked by soundness and caution in handling facts. The logical processes underlying language in general have been analyzed in a number of essays by Dr. Raoul de la Grasserie in his *'Studies in Comparative Grammar." He has taken up in turn such topics as; ' the substantive verb," " pronouns, " " tenses, ' etc., and striven to show by a very wide induction how these fundamentalgrammatical notions arose in the mind, and in what varied forms they sought expressiorl in speech. The study above referred to, on "the category of moods" extends these comparisons to that feature of the verb. It is a masterly application of the principles of psychology to the evolution of language. The Elements of Dynamtc Electrictty and Magnettenl. By PHILIP AT:KINSON. New York, Van Nostrand. 405 p. 8Q. As this is intendedmore for learners than for the learned, it appeals to a larger circle than do many other works on the subjects treated, and, for the sanle reason, mathe-matical £ormulse are conspicuous by their absence. Mathematical reasoning, where required, has been, so far as possible, rendered intelligible to non-mathernatical readers by the use of ordinary language arld some unavoidable circumlocution, so that the anaount of Inathematical formulae required has been practically reduced to a few simple expressions easily understood by persons familiar with fiithmetic. The work is divided into thirteen chapters, each of which is intended to be a complete treatise on the subject to which it relates, and the whole to embrace all the essential facts pertaining to dynamic electricity. The chronological order of electrical development has been followed pretty closely, thus not only giving a condensed history of the progress made in the science, but also showing the relations of each successive important invention to those which preceded al3d followed it. The style of the work is as clear as a due regard for the conciseness necessary in such a treatise will admit. The different parts of the subject are taken up ln the follovving order, a chapter being devoted to each. Tlle voltaic baittery, with definitions of the terms used; one-uid cells; two-fluid cells, and battery formation; magnetism; electromagnetism; electric measurement; the dynamo and motor; electrolysis; electric storage; the relations of electricity to heat; the relations of electricity to light; the electric telegraph; and the telephone. Pr?ssian Schools throtzgh American Eyes. By JAMES RUSSELL PARSONS, JR. Syracuse. Bardeen. 8° $1. THE author of this booli was recently United States Consul at Aix-la-Chapelle, and was employed by the authorities of the State of Nezv York to make a leport on the organization and methods of the Prussian schools, with a view to obtaining hints from them for the improvement of our own. Having been a school coumissioner in New Yorlt State for some years, and being; greatly interested in the pllblic schools, Mr. Parsons took up the task alssigned him with ardor and intelligence, and now gives us in this volume the result of his inquiries. The report is drawn up in the fiusual style of public documents, with little pretence of literary form, so that it is not so attrac{;ive to the reader as it might otherwise have been; but it presents a large anlount of information concerning the Prussian schools in a form convenient for reference. It treats of the organization and governrnent Of the schools, the methodslof discipline and of -teaching, with some account of the buildings and apparatus, and gives a very full exposition of tlle courses of study. The normal schools are also dwelt upon at considerable length, and the mode of training teachers described. Professor Hugo Schuchardt is the most distinguished student living of mixed language.s or " jargons," and his researches into their structure have been prolific of valuable results. The above is but one-the ninth-of his numerous ' Creole Studies." It is one of the most instructive, as exhibiting the results of the commingling of the Portuguese with the ZIalagan languages, which are particularlv widely apart. Like all his essays, it is replete with erudition, and marked by soundness and caution in handling facts. The logical processes underlying language in general have been analyzed in a number of essays by Dr. Raoul de la Grasserie in his *'Studies in Comparative Grammar." He has taken up in turn such topics as; ' the substantive verb," " pronouns, " " tenses, ' etc., and striven to show by a very wide induction how these fundamentalgrammatical notions arose in the mind, and in what varied forms they sought expressiorl in speech. The study above referred to, on "the category of moods" extends these comparisons to that feature of the verb. It is a masterly application of the principles of psychology to the evolution of language. The Elements of Dynamtc Electrictty and Magnettenl. By PHILIP AT:KINSON. New York, Van Nostrand. 405 p. 8Q. As this is intendedmore for learners than for the learned, it appeals to a larger circle than do many other works on the subjects treated, and, for the sanle reason, mathe-matical £ormulse are conspicuous by their absence. Mathematical reasoning, where required, has been, so far as possible, rendered intelligible to non-mathernatical readers by the use of ordinary language arld some unavoidable circumlocution, so that the anaount of Inathematical formulae required has been practically reduced to a few simple expressions easily understood by persons familiar with fiithmetic.
fatcat:nvvqcng7zvaj3gm637mnr2qivq