Measuring patient satisfaction with video consultation: a systematic review of assessment tools and their measurement properties

Esther Z. Barsom, Ewout van Hees, Willem A. Bemelman, Marlies P. Schijven
2020 International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care  
Video consultation (VC) is considered promising in delivering healthcare closer to the patient and improving patient satisfaction. Indeed, providing care-at-distance via VC is believed to be promising for some situations and patients, serving their needs without associated concomitant costs. In order to assess implementation and perceived benefits, patient satisfaction is frequently measured. Measuring patient satisfaction with VC in healthcare is often performed using quantitative and
more » ... tative and qualitative outcome analysis. As studies employ different surveys, pooling of data on the topic is troublesome. This systematic review critically appraises, summarizes, and compares available questionnaires in order to identify the most suitable questionnaire for qualitative outcome research using VC in clinical outpatient care. Methods PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane were searched for relevant articles using predefined inclusion criteria. Methodological quality appraisal of yielded questionnaires to assess VC was performed using the validated COSMIN guideline. Results This systematic search identified twelve studies that used ten different patient satisfaction questionnaires. The overall quality of nine questionnaires was rated as "inadequate" to "doubtful" according to the COSMIN criteria. None of the questionnaires retrieved completed a robust validation process for the purpose of use. Conclusion and recommendations Although high-quality studies on measurement properties of these questionnaires are scarce, the questionnaire developed by Mekhjian has the highest methodological quality achieving validity on internal consistency and the use of a large sample size. Moreover, this questionnaire can be used across healthcare settings. This finding may be instrumental in further studies measuring patient satisfaction with VC.
doi:10.1017/s0266462320000367 pmid:32624044 fatcat:5wfmzzfj7jfxpdkmd5c4m5g2rm