BLOK'S NONFICTION: THE PEOPLE, THE INTELLIGENTSIA, AND CARNIVAL

TIMOTHY C. WESTPHALEN
1997 Canadian-American Slavic Studies  
BLOK'S NONFICTION: THE PEOPLE, THE INTELLIGENTSIA, AND CARNIVAL 1 Russian Symbolist nonfiction marked a sharp break with tradition. As Dmitrii Maksimov once observed of its criticism, "Comparing Symbolist criticism with the criticism of the Russian literary and social 'thick' journals, it is easy to convince one's self that the former and the latter have between themselves little in common."1 Dikman has argued that this break stemmed largely from the "impressionistic character of the Symbolist
more » ... eview."2 Such sharp divisions often led to complete and mutual incomprehension between the Symbolists and the reading public at large. To take but one example, when Blok submitted his article "The People and the Intelligentsia" [Narod i intelligentsiia] to the journal Russian Thought [Russkaia mysl'], the editor, Petr Struve, called the article "naive"3 and refused to place it even though there had been a tacit understanding that the article would be published.4
doi:10.1163/221023997x00834 fatcat:pyspyn2dnva3dotmuy7km5inte