Emotion and adventure therapy : A model [article]

Christopher Paul King, University Of Canterbury
2012
The cognitive zeitgeist within the psychotherapy literature of the last decades has tended to obscure the role of emotion, emphasising instead the role of cognition and behaviour in psychotherapeutic change. It seems anomalous that clinically oriented psychologists should have neglected emotion to such a degree, as emotional distress of one type or another is the currency of psychotherapy. Concurrent with the neglect of emotion in the psychotherapy literature, within general psychology there
more » ... psychology there has been a resurgence of interest in emotion as a fundamental aspect of human experience. Following the course set by Jeremy Safran & Leslie Greenberg, the individuals who have alerted the psychotherapeutic community to the need for cognisance of the general psychology work on emotion, an attempt has been made to form an amalgam which acknowledges both the therapeutic and academic knowledge about emotion. That is the first element of the discussion presented below. The second major element is Adventure Therapy. Adventure Therapy, as a means of addressing difficulties of various sorts, has been a part of the therapeutic landscape for almost one hundred years. There has been a recent resurgence of interest in Adventure Therapy, particularly as the need for alternatives to traditional 'talking' therapies for some populations has been recognised. The view taken here is that Adventure Therapy is indeed a form of psychotherapy and not merely a specialised form of recreation undertaken with particular populations. In much the same way as many other forms of therapy, Adventure Therapy is partially defined by the environment, procedures and techniques which constitute the practical aspect of the approach. Behind this is the theory that provides the rationale for the more tangible aspects. For instance, classical psychoanalysis has the unconscious, free association, and the ubiquitous couch, while Adventure Therapy has the outdoors and activities such as climbing, abseiling, kayaking, and tramping. As will become apparent, for Adve [...]
doi:10.26021/6739 fatcat:ntuihwfmkndgbpvn7xktqry7le