The Brexit Phenomenon

Dumitrita FLOREA, Narcisa GALES
2017 European Journal of Law and Public Administration  
On June 23, 2016, citizens of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland voted, approximately 52%, to leave the country in the European Union. More than 40 years have passed since the British joined the Community Bloc, and it seems that then, as it is now, the process was laborious and indescribable. The phenomenon called Brexit is announcing a difficult process in practice that is expected to be completed on March 29, 2019 at 23 o'clock in England. The talks are taking place on
more » ... e taking place on three levels of how Brexit will work and how much Britain holds in the European Union, what will happen to the Northern Ireland border and what will happen to the British citizens who are settled in other parts of the EU and at the same time what will happen to Union citizens living in the UK. Of course, the legal consequences of the UK's exit from the European Union are complex and can not yet be fully elucidated, given that the phenomenon is an absolutely new one in the field of international law. In particular, we are witnessing a genuine negotiation process between the UK and the EU: the UK discusses future trade and exchange relations and a plan for the two transition years set to smooth the way for post-Brexit international relations, and the EU refuses to talk about the future until there is enough progress on the various issues that have arisen. We are currently witnessing the reconstruction of Europe as we know it, remodeling the shape of the old continent, and we look forward to seeing the final shape that Brexit will wear, with all its legal consequences.
doi:10.18662/eljpa/02 fatcat:mhtznfs2gjc3lotwoavidd356q